Welsh village loses internet everyday at 7am daily for 18 months

Started by Mastafrank, September 23, 2020, 08:21:02 PM

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Gyppo

It's a fascinating story,but you have to wonder why it took them eighteen months to get around to using the 'spectrum sniffer'.  Particularly as the failure was so consistent.

Mastafrank


Jo Bannister

My neighbours lose phone, broadband, the lot, twice a year, early spring and late autumn.  Turned out the useless bloody engineers had laid their cable on top of the hedge running down the lane, so twice a year the guy cutting the hedges cut the cable as well.  Even now they've figured it out, it hasn't been put somewhere appropriate, like up a pole or in a trench.

Mastafrank

Quote from: Jo Bannister on September 25, 2020, 08:55:56 AM
My neighbours lose phone, broadband, the lot, twice a year, early spring and late autumn.  Turned out the useless bloody engineers had laid their cable on top of the hedge running down the lane, so twice a year the guy cutting the hedges cut the cable as well.  Even now they've figured it out, it hasn't been put somewhere appropriate, like up a pole or in a trench.

Who the hell puts cable "on top" lmao sounds like laziness to me lol

Gyppo

It's certainly a short-sighted approach.

The installers themselves might tell you they aren't allowed long enough per installation to do the job properly.  There may be an element of truth in this, but after a few breaks someone should have sorted it out by now.

When I first had broadband installed - back at the house  - the chap whose job was to bury the cable from the pavement junction box to my house wall tried in vain with his little trenching spade to make little more than a shallow scratch through fifty years accumulated tree and hedge roots and thick grass under-thatch.  It was fascinating to watch him try.  It was a hopeless task so he knocked on the door and asked if it would be okay to lay it in a tough plastic conduit, which they normally bury a few inches deep, along the bottom of my hedge, but inside the garden boundary.

The alternative was to wait another week or ten days until they could get a man out with a mini-digger to cut the trench.  I didn't fancy that, having waited quite long enough, so the conduit was snaked though the bottom of my hedge where it eventually buried itself in a few years accumulation of leaf-mould.

When I moved out the new tenant ripped out the hedge to turn the front garden into a parking space and there were bits of green conduit - grown brittle with age - spread all over the place and a stub of cable left hanging from the wall.  Which is still there, with a new one entering alongside.

But a cable in the hedge, at ground level, works well.

At the bungalow cable access was already built in as part of the building, with sturdy pipes buried well below the surface.  All they had to do was drag the cable through from a connection just a few yards up the road and drill a small hole in my wall.  Very neat and efficient.

Gyppo

Mastafrank

I suppose in the long run it's more expensive to hire a digger..all the new housing already have underground junctions etc..

Nowadays they use  big vacuum trucks to dig underground without cutting into delicate infrastructure