Best Writing Forum

The Bar & Grill => The Bar & Grill => Topic started by: Spell Chick on January 30, 2018, 03:05:45 PM

Title: Cookbook time
Post by: Spell Chick on January 30, 2018, 03:05:45 PM
Finally it is not raining and we are having ...


Shrimp in Garlic Butter or shrimp on the barbie

½ cup butter
3 cloves garlic, minced
1 tablespoon parsley flakes
2 tablespoons lemon juice
¼ teaspoon salt or seasoned salt
1 ½ to 2 pounds cleaned and shelled fresh shrimp

Before grilling: melt butter in small pan. Add garlic, parsley, lemon juice and salt; reserve for basting sauce. Thread shrimp on 4 to 6 skewers

On the grill: place shrimp on greased grill, 4 to 6 inches from hot coals. Cook 15 to 20 minutes, turning and brushing occasionally with garlic butter until done. 4 to 6 servings.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Firefly on January 31, 2018, 01:27:26 AM
Yum, I like the sound of that one mate.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: graphophobia on January 31, 2018, 02:23:40 AM
Oh yum! I love love love garlic.! We're just having pan fried fish and a salad, too hot to cook anything complicated.  :)
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Jewel on February 01, 2018, 02:24:39 PM
Sounds yummy.

I thought we were the only barbarians that did barbies on open coals... nice to learn there are other unregulated folk, somewhere, out there, in the big wide world.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Dansinger on February 01, 2018, 09:01:36 PM
Sounds yummy.

I thought we were the only barbarians that did barbies on open coals... nice to learn there are other unregulated folk, somewhere, out there, in the big wide world.

You're definitely not alone. Barbie is on open coals. Anything else is fake barbie.

No shrimps for me though, thank you very much.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Spell Chick on February 02, 2018, 01:58:12 AM
One of my favorite ways to use leftover chicken.

Chicken with Penne Rosa

8 oz Penne Pasta
water
salt
olive oil
2 c leftover chicken cut into strips or cubed
½ c white mushrooms, quartered
¼ - ½  c pitted black olives, cut in half
½ c artichoke hearts, quartered (best to use ones marinated in olive oil)
Parmesan Cheese
Rosa Sauce:
   ½ jar spaghetti sauce
   ½ c heavy cream

Make the Rosa Sauce: Stir spaghetti sauce and cream together and heat in saucepan until warm.

Boil penne pasta in lightly salted water (w/ a bit of olive oil to keep it from sticking) until almost done. Set pan aside off the heat. It will continue to cook gently by itself.

Warm chicken in olive oil in sauté pan. Add mushrooms and cover. When mushrooms are tender, add black olives. Re-cover and let sit while you finish the pasta.

Drain pasta. Return to pasta pot. Add artichoke hearts to pasta. Mix in the Rosa sauce and heat thoroughly. Add chicken/mushroom/olive mixture into pasta. Serve and top with grated parmesan cheese.

I get everything ready before I start cooking this one, just because it goes pretty quick.

Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Firefly on February 02, 2018, 07:08:44 AM
I do a similar one but add aborio rice and throw it in the oven, yum yum  ;D
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: WordBird on February 02, 2018, 12:25:36 PM
That shrimp sounds really good. We didn't use our grill for so long it just rusted and crumbled apart. We ended up setting it out for the garbage pickup. One of these days I'm going to get another one and try my hand at some things.

I eat a chicken penne kind of thing for lunch most days at work. It is a frozen dinner thing we pick up for cheap at the store. It has a colander-like plastic thing with the sauce in the bottom. When microwaving, it steams the chicken, pasta and vegies. Not bad for an instant dish.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Laura on February 10, 2018, 08:54:59 PM
We use one or other of our grills at least once a week. The gas one is easy to fire up on weeknights, the coals we do on the weekend.

However, it's raining today. A real frog strangler. Looks like I'll be cleaning out the fridge to make soup.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on February 10, 2018, 10:31:47 PM
The jury - well, me - is still out on yams (sweet potatoes).  Sis used them in an excellent stew I had at her place a while back, so I bought some and tried them in the slow cooker today along with other veggies and a couple of lamb chops.

They weren't horrible, but they seemed a bit insipid.  In Sis's stew they would have had various spices.  I'll use them up, but...
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Firefly on February 10, 2018, 11:18:06 PM
Gyp bake them with a bit of butter and cinnamon sugar sprinkled over them, they are amazing then. Or cut them into chips and fry in oil or the oven.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on February 11, 2018, 12:57:04 AM
Butter and cinnamon sugar?  That sounds interesting.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Firefly on February 11, 2018, 01:28:45 AM
Yup, delicious. Just adds that little something or mash them with butter, garlic oil, cinnamon and lime juice. It's a versatile veg
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Laura on February 11, 2018, 03:12:17 AM
Sweet potatoes are also great when salted and roasted in the oven with chopped onion.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Firefly on February 11, 2018, 03:22:31 AM
They are one of my fave veg I have to say mate
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Spell Chick on February 11, 2018, 11:26:15 AM
I like them a lot, but not with beef. That may have been Gyp's problem. I like them with pork and poultry. I like them by themselves and served under a bunch of cheese covered broccoli and cauliflower with maybe some water chestnuts, too.

But not with beef or seafood.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on February 11, 2018, 01:18:07 PM
Here's a veggie recipe for sweet pots:

You need to cook these things separately (but at the same time) then layer to server.

Bottom layer is a couple of leeks sweated in butter with crushed garlic and fresh tarragon.

Next layer is your sweet post cut small and roasted in olive oil until soft and starting to brown.

Then a layer of cheery toms also roasted in olive oil and well seasoned.

Finally top with a couple of poached eggs per person.

Serve with crusty French bread to mop up the juices and a chilled Pinot Grigio.  :)
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Amie on February 11, 2018, 04:54:53 PM
One of my favourite dishes when I was a student was to peel and cube sweet potato, fry it in oil or ghee with an equal anoint of sliced onion, then when halfway cooked, add 1-2 green peppers in a 1-2 cm dice, sliced garlic, and whatever spices take your fancy (e.g. I'd always add chili, and then maybe something like garam masala or Chinese five spice, or even cinnamon and nutmeg, or maybe a little cardamom), then cook on medium high until browned and cooked through (better crispy than soggy, but there is an art to the stirring and temp control :) )

Serve with a yummy fragrant long-grain rice like basmati
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: graphophobia on February 11, 2018, 08:08:12 PM
Does anyone have a tried and true fried rice recipe? My local takeaway has put up their prices (again!) so I'm trying to make a decent version at home, a bit cheaper and probably a bit healthier.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on February 11, 2018, 08:34:24 PM
Yep.

Boil the rice, rinse it and set aside.

Beat an egg and sit it aside.

Fry the stuff you want fried. Then chuck in stuff that does not need frying (peas zapped in the microwave for example). Add the rice to the wok and stir into the veg to re-heat it.  Finally add the beaten egg and stir on the heat until the egg has cooked.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Vienna on February 12, 2018, 11:22:37 AM
Don't just set the rice aside. Unless you have left overs in the fridge, cook the rice the day before. Cold rice is better for fried rice.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: graphophobia on February 12, 2018, 07:56:57 PM
Thanks for the tips Mark and Vienna :). That sounds easy enough! I had wondered about the rice and if you used it hot or cold, or had to precook it before adding other ingredients. I'm a good baker, but not that experienced in the savory department.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Firefly on February 13, 2018, 04:20:46 AM
Mark I like that sweet potato recipe, will give it a burl  ;D
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: graphophobia on February 14, 2018, 07:06:39 PM
I'm on the hunt for a really great shortbread recipe if anyone has one. I've made the same recipe for a few years now and thought I try out a new one. :)
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Firefly on March 11, 2018, 10:02:18 PM
A link to a great no knead bread. I couldn't find Amie and Marks bread thread to add it to that

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I0t8ZAhb8lQ
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on March 11, 2018, 10:59:10 PM
I'm on the hunt for a really great shortbread recipe if anyone has one. I've made the same recipe for a few years now and thought I try out a new one. :)

Bit late in responding, but here's the one we used at the village bakery.  We worked in pounds but you can make a small batch in ounces to try it out.  The recipe below will make about a pound of shortbread and is easily scaled up if you like it.

9 oz plain cake flour (Don't be tempted to use bread flour, it will make it tough.)

6 oz butter (or some mixture of butter and margarine to the same total weight.  All butter is best for taste obviously.

2 1/2 oz of sugar.  Caster is best, but you can get by with granulated although the shortbread has a slightly gritty look.

Method:  Cream fat and sugar together, scraping down the bowl regularly to avoid any lumps.

Add in the flour, mixing to a smooth consistency.  In the bigger quantities we'd add an egg, but you have to be careful not to make the mix too wet.

We used to bake the commercial batches in a big sheet, 18" by 30", marked up into fingers about three quarters of an inch thick (tray depth) and an inch wide. But you can roll it out, dusting the table with rice flour and cut it out into biscuit shapes with cutters and placing them on a baking sheet/tray.  In which case three eighths of an inch or less thick is more appropriate.  We also did seasonal variations such as Christmas trees, or Valentine hearts.

The first place I worked we used to press the stuff into wooden moulds, well dusted, to make Scottish Thistle shapes or other Scotty emblems.  But plain fingers sold best.  I think they were perceived as offering better value for money.

Bake at around 190 C , or 370 F.  Or whatever temperature  you use for your own shortbread recipe because all ovens are different.  (I'm still adjusting to a fan oven myself, with either lower temps or reduced baking times.)

Loose biscuits probably take around fifteen minutes, the whole sheet will take longer but watch for the colour.  Everyone talks about 'golden brown' but this colour varies according your own perceptions.  I tend towards the lighter end myself.

We used to sprinkle the whole sheet with sugar when it left the oven but before it cooled.

Let them cool thoroughly before handling.  Cut the sheet into fingers before trying to remove it from the tray.  That way you get a nice clean cut without any crumbling.  Once cold they'll slip out easily enough with a palette knife underneath.  The first row may get a little damaged, but they're the bakers 'tasters anyway ;-)

To make it even 'shorter' replace some of the cake flour with rice flour.  Up to about 10% of the weight.  So with the quantities I've given replacing one oz of cake flour with rice flour would be near enough.

To be honest I don't think the difference in texture is noticeable enough to be worth the bother.  If we were running low on rice flour and left it out none of the customers complained.  Almost a baker's superstition rather than an essential step ;-)

Hope it works for you, which is why I suggest making the small batch first.

Gyppo
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on March 11, 2018, 11:05:12 PM
Thanks, FF. Interesting vid. I'd not seen the trick with the parchment and the casserole dish before.

I use the no knead method for my baguettes. The time it takes to prove (about 14 hours) is not really an issue as I spread it over 2 days - mix day 1 bake day 2. I might try the hot water thing though, just to see what it turns out like.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Firefly on March 11, 2018, 11:08:21 PM
I thought it would be good for us camping Mark, speed things up greatly  ;D
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on March 11, 2018, 11:13:53 PM
If it is speed you want I have a brilliant recipe for soft white rolls that take less than an hour from weighing ingredients to finished baking!
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Firefly on March 11, 2018, 11:14:55 PM
 :o :o

Yes please Mark, if you would like to part with it mate.  ;D
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on March 12, 2018, 07:38:04 AM
425g - white bread flour
3 tsp. - yeast
1 tsp. - sugar
1 tsp. - salt
50g - sunflower oil
240g - warm water

Mix and knead for 8 mins. Prove in a warm spot for 15 mins.

Gently form into a ball without really knocking back. Then cut off into chunks and form into flat balls. For bigger (or sub rolls), make 5 of 150g each. For medium sized rolls, make 6 of 125g each (in picture.)

Dust tops with plenty of flour and prove in a warm spot for 15 mins.

I bake in the Aga but I estimate about 13-15 mins in a conventional oven at 210 deg (190 deg fan).
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Firefly on March 12, 2018, 08:47:26 AM
Thanks heaps Mark that will go well in the barbie  :D
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: graphophobia on March 12, 2018, 09:29:03 PM
Made Gyppo's shortbread, very nice texture (and as it was all gone the next day, I think I'm not the only one who thought so.) Those bread rolls look delicious, I think they'd make good dinner rolls.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on March 12, 2018, 10:13:32 PM
I'm glad.  There was no reason why it shouldn't work, but it's always good when someone else gets it right.  Did you do biscuits or fingers?

It's certainly not a diet recipe though ;-)
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: graphophobia on March 13, 2018, 07:54:28 PM
I went with the plain fingers. Next batch, I think I'll give rice flour a go. I've used cornflour but never rice flour, so will be interested to taste the difference.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on March 13, 2018, 08:30:36 PM
graph

Here's my shortbread recipe.

5 oz Self-raising flour
1 oz rice flour
2 oz caster sugar
4 oz butter
1/2 tsp vanilla essence

Mark
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on March 14, 2018, 06:24:55 PM
@firefly

This is a loaf I made using the baking method in the vid you posted - though I used my own sourdough recipe. The method works well.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Firefly on March 14, 2018, 07:59:33 PM
That really does look nice Mark. Does it make the bread a bit more moist or what was the main difference, if any, you found?
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on March 14, 2018, 08:27:25 PM
It is almost identical, but I was able to cook it in the Aga rather than faff about with the fan oven. And, although I didn't try it this time, I reckon you could make a wetter dough using this method because the casserole (dutch oven) prevents it spreading. And the wetter dough might give a better crumb.

M
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Firefly on March 14, 2018, 08:34:36 PM
I have an oven similar to an Aga but a modern version, not wood fired. I would love a wood one mate, the taste of baked goods in them is amazing.

I have the roll recipe printed and in the van for the July trip, I'll let you know how it goes
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: graphophobia on March 14, 2018, 09:22:54 PM
graph

Here's my shortbread recipe.

5 oz Self-raising flour
1 oz rice flour
2 oz caster sugar
4 oz butter
1/2 tsp vanilla essence

Mark

Thanks Mark, I'll make this recipe for my next batch and let you know how I get on.  :)
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on March 15, 2018, 07:12:23 AM
I have an oven similar to an Aga but a modern version, not wood fired. I would love a wood one mate, the taste of baked goods in them is amazing.

I have the roll recipe printed and in the van for the July trip, I'll let you know how it goes

My Aga is oil fired and always on. It's brilliant and even if it's off for a day, for cleaning or service, I miss it. I cook most things on it (or more usually in it) even toast.

I'd like a traditional wood-fired pizza/bread oven, though as I'm basically lazy I worry that after the novelty had worn off, I'd finding lighting it too much effort.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on March 15, 2018, 08:12:05 AM
Naan Bread

180g      water
6 tbsp.   yogurt
2 tbsp.   olive oil
1.5 tsp.   yeast
2 tsp.   sugar
450g      plain white flour
1.5 tsp.   salt
25g      butter

Extra butter melted with crushed garlic to brush before serving.

Weigh the water then whisk in: yogurt, oil, yeast and sugar. Add the flour, salt, and butter and knead for 10 mins.

Pre heat baking tray in the oven. 220c conventional 200c fan.

Knock back and divide into 6 balls. Flatten and roll into shape. Cook in 2 batches of 3 for 6 minutes (turn after 3 mins if not using fan oven). Then put under a hot grill (grill first batch as second batch is baking) until brown and puffed up.

If not serving immed. Re-heat by spraying with a bit of water and then cook (same temp) for 2 to 3 mins un-covered.

Brush with melted butter/garlic before serving.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Firefly on March 15, 2018, 08:30:51 AM
I love this one, try it out this weekend thanks Mark  :D
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on March 15, 2018, 09:38:42 AM
I made those last night to have with a vegetable dahl. They are perfect for scooping up mouthfuls of creamy lentils.  :)
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: graphophobia on March 15, 2018, 09:35:54 PM
Made this last night with some of the latest apple crop, delicious and very easy to make.  :)

MARY BERRY'S APPLE DESSERT CAKE

225g (8 oz) self-raising flour
1 level teaspoon baking powder
225g (8 oz) caster sugar
2 eggs
½ teaspoon almond extract
150g (5 oz) butter, melted
350g (12 oz) cooking apples, peeled and cored
25g (1 oz) flaked almonds

Preheat the oven to 160ºC/Fan 140ºC/Gas 3.    Lightly grease a deep 20 cm  loose-bottomed cake tin.
Measure the flour, baking powder, sugar, eggs, almond extract and melted butter into a bowl. Mix well until blended, then beat for a minute. Spread half this mixture into the prepared tin. Thickly slice the apples and lay on top of the mixture in the tin, piling mostly towards the centre. Using 2 dessertspoons, roughly spoon the remaining mixture over the apples, making sure that the mixture covers the centre well as it will spread out in the oven. Sprinkle with the flaked almonds.
Bake in the preheated oven for 1¼–1½ hours until golden and coming away from the sides of the tin. Serve with custard or ice cream, or if it's been that kind of day, both.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Firefly on March 18, 2018, 10:22:26 AM
Yummo, looks great too  ;D
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: graphophobia on March 22, 2018, 10:27:24 PM
OK bakers, who is a Hot Cross Bun expert? I thought I'd give them a bash this Easter. What's your favourite recipe? Fruity? Fruitless? To chocolate chip or not to chocolate chip? Do you get all fancy with white chocolate, apricots or cranberries? Or strictly traditional?  :)
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Firefly on March 22, 2018, 11:31:26 PM
Never tried to make them Graph but they have to have fruit and I do love the choc ones with the choc chip. I have avoided them since seeing them being sold since Christmas, on bloody principal.  ;D ;D
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on March 23, 2018, 02:42:55 AM
I have avoided them since seeing them being sold since Christmas, on bloody principal.  ;D ;D

I've never made them except commercially on a fairly grand scale.  Haven't eaten one in years.  Don't like the thought of any so called exotic versions.  Just nice plump sultanas, currants, and I think there was some mixed peel in there.

The magic ingredient commercially was 'liquid bun spice, which came in big plastic bottles and filled the air with that glorious aroma when baking them.  I have no idea what was in it.  I can tell you it tasted foul if you splashed it on your skin and licked it out of curiosity.

Bakers would go out and splash a little on the pavement outside the shop early in the morning, like a young stud splashing on the aftershave ;-)  The whole shopping arcade or village street would smell of Hot Cross buns all day.  After an hour or so of working at the source  you never even noticed any more.  Rather sad in some some ways.  But a baker's nose remains sensitive to things which are wrong, loaves  starting to scorch, fryer oil too hot, the smell of butane as the gas pressure drops too low in the burners under the prover pots, or a wind blows them out, or some silly little bitch wearing patchouli who will have to be kept away from the fresh cream goods because they'll pick up a taint, etc.

(I wrote a poem about bakery 'smells' once.  I'll have to see if I can find it.)

The 'crossing paste', which we applied with a piping bag just before the buns went into the oven, was little more than flour and water.

We also glazed them when they came back out of the oven, with 'bun glaze' slapped on generously with a large soft brush.  This was just a sugary solution, which made them 'sticky buns'.  There was always a percentage of the customers who preferred them unglazed, so a gross  (144, or about three trays full) out of every thousand avoided the slopping process.

When you've spent a spent a few days isolated over to one side of the bakery making nothing but 'those bloody buns' they cease to be exotic and interesting.


But compared to the pre-packed ones you see in the shops now all year round they were masterpieces.

Traditionally, in small village bakeries at least,  one bun from each year would be wedged up behind the electrical wiring or trunking in a tucked away corner of the bakery 'for luck'.  These buns never went mouldy, they just dried out as hard as rocks over the years.  In due course they'd be painted over when the premises were redecorated.

I can remember the electrician being told to leave an otherwise disconnected length of old wiring stapled to the wall to keep the buns in place, and to 'work around them' when the place was rewired.  He was happy to also leave a slightly slack loop in the new wires for future buns.  Modern plastic conduit fitted flush to the walls tends to discourage those kinds of traditions.

I guess a lot of trades have their superstitions and rituals , and even if you don't really believe in it you find yourself strangely reluctant to be the one who 'breaks the chain' established by the previous generations ;-)

But if I started making buns at home every year I don't think I'd feel compelled to start a new line of dried out remnants, so it's definitely a 'trade' thing.

Gyppo

Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on March 23, 2018, 08:50:08 AM
In the past, I've used my Chelsea bun recipe but added the fruit and spice to the dough rather than spreading and rolling. I might try something new this year - perhaps with a splash of maple syrup.

I've never bothered with crosses but will give them a go this year.

The glaze is just 3 tbsp caster sugar and 2 tbsp water, boiled until you have a syrup. This adds sweetness without detracting from the flavour. I've never tried alternatives (melted jam or golden syrup) as I think they could mask the spicy taste.

M

Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on March 23, 2018, 10:15:17 AM
I would imagine golden syrup or boiled jam would make them horribly sticky.

Ar one point bakers could buy rice-paper crosses to put on top of buns.  Horribly fiddly compared to just piping long lines up and across the trays.

That's the beauty of working at home, you make it the way you want ;-)

=====

Just like the way a Cornish housewife doesn't make up a special recipe if she has a vegetarian child.  She just leaves out the meat and goes a bit heavier on the veggies.   If the child stays vegetarian she may start to experiment a bit with adding chopped apples in season, stuff like that.  Unlike the line fed to tourists the pasty is convenience food, not The Holy Grail of catering.

If there are any trade secrets it's in the seasoning, which is just salt and pepper, but well known firms have their own special ratios there.  They can sometimes be very selective about exactly which sort of pepper.  Quite often it just comes down to a trade name they've come to trust for consistency.

I've never tried a pasty made with Quorn or similar in exchange for the meat, but i don't see why not if you eat the stuff normally.

Years back we had a sales rep trying to sell us on the concept of 'hydrolysed vegetable protein', which he described as 'the food of the future'.  "It makes meat products taste 'more meaty', but saves a lot of money.  You can stick to the required legal minimum percentage of meat but fool the customers into thinking they're getting more."

Our Scots Head Baker, despite being well known for his thrift, looked at the sample in the jar and delivered his verdict.  "It looks like a pathological specimen.  I would be ashamed to add that to anything we make here.  It would be dishonest."

===



Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on March 23, 2018, 03:56:12 PM
I made some using my made-up recipe. They look OK (not tasted yet) but the dough was very wet and with lots of fruit quite tricky to handle. Checking out some other recipes, they probably needed more flour, maybe as much as 150g.

Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on March 23, 2018, 04:28:03 PM
Looks good, mark..  Highly fruited doughs are more difficult to handle.  Goes with the territory ;-)
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Heidi52 on March 23, 2018, 05:58:48 PM
Making baked Halibut filets for dinner this evening. Don't want to brag (much) but ever since I learned this secret, my fish rivals anything we've gotten in any fancy fish restaurant.

You can use any firm white fish. You can probably do salmon as well, just haven't tried it myself.

Preheat over to 400 degrees F (204 C)

Mix together 1/4 cup panko breadcrumbs with 1/2 t garlic powder, 1/2 t lemon peel and 1 tsp dill.

Heat 2Tbs olive oil in an ovenproof skillet on medium high till almost shimmery.

Coat one side of fish with mayonaise (really!) and roll in breadcrumbs. Place in skillet crumb side down. Cook undisturbed until golden brown, about 3 minutes. Flip fish over and put in oven to continue cooking (about 20-25 minutes depending on size)

I'm serving them with oven french fries and home made coleslaw.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on March 23, 2018, 06:31:59 PM
I've now tasted (as in eaten one) the HCBs and I'm happy to share.

Dough:

1 egg (beaten)
240g water
460g plain flour
50g caster sugar
50g butter
2 tbsp milk powder
2 tsp yeast
1 tsp salt
1 tsp maple syrup
1 tsp mixed spice
1 tsp cinnamon
50g sultanas
50g currants
50g mixed Italian peel

Mix and knead etc and prove for 1.5 to 2 hrs.

Make 10 buns and prove for 45 mins

For crosses:
3 tbsp plain flour
enough water to make a gloopy substance the consistency of porridge.

Pipe on the crosses using a plastic resealable sandwich bag with a very small hole cut in the corner.

I baked in the Aga but I reckon ~15 mins at 200c would be about right in a fan oven.

Glaze:
3 tbsp caster sugar
2 tbsp water

Boil until you have a clear syrup then brush on the buns.




Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: graphophobia on March 25, 2018, 10:18:59 PM
They look great, Mark. Will definitely give your recipe a crack. Are the crosses difficult to get right? I'm a bit of a traditionalist, fruit buns with a bit of chocolate is as fancy as I get. Last week I spotted some banana chocolate chip hot cross buns in our local supermarket. I think that's going a bit too far!

Gyppo, the liquid bun spice sounds wonderful, I'd probably wear it myself! When I left school, I worked in a cafe and my Friday afternoon job was cleaning the grease trap. No matter how much I showered before going out, people around me could always smell chips. Spicy buns would be much better!

I agree with you, Firefly about the Easter stuff in shops way too soon. Here, there were hot cross buns on sale in January. How can anything be a special, seasonal treat if you can get it all year round?
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on March 25, 2018, 11:21:37 PM
Gyppo, the liquid bun spice sounds wonderful, I'd probably wear it myself! When I left school, I worked in a cafe and my Friday afternoon job was cleaning the grease trap. No matter how much I showered before going out, people around me could always smell chips. Spicy buns would be much better!

How can anything be a special, seasonal treat if you can get it all year round?

1)  Some girls liked it and some didn't ;-)  If you splashed it on your skin it was quite vicious stuff, packing a sting.

Fryer smells are persistent, as is the pasty smell when you mix loads of filling by hand.  Onion was always the dominant note according to my wife and kids, no matter how hard you tried to wash it off.

2)  Seasonal stuff should be seasonal.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Firefly on March 25, 2018, 11:27:53 PM
Years ago, I had a job pickling onions, yep, I could clear a room  ;D
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on March 25, 2018, 11:35:12 PM
Food prep's a funny thing.  Some smells which seem rather nice in small doses can really stink en-masse.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on March 26, 2018, 07:42:30 AM
They look great, Mark. Will definitely give your recipe a crack. Are the crosses difficult to get right? ...

I'd never tried them before, so I had a bit of a practice on some kitchen paper. My first batch was too stiff and my hole was too big (as the actress said to the bishop) but the second batch was spot on. Then doing the crosses was easier than I'd expected. In hindsight, I could have made it easier still by having the buns lined up.

Do all the east west lines first then all the north south. That way you just go from bun to bun in a nice smooth movement.

I liked the way the crosses sank unto the bun when baked; it looks as if I'd cut a grove for them to sit in.

Let us know how you get on.

M
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: graphophobia on March 26, 2018, 09:54:30 PM
Thanks for the tips, will do a practice run as suggested just to get the feel of it. It's usually the little jobs that I expect to be easy that give me the most trouble!
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on April 02, 2018, 04:12:35 PM
These are sesame topped, cider and parmesan bagels.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Firefly on April 02, 2018, 10:30:55 PM
They look delicious Mark.

I still haven't made the rolls you put up, so much going on with real life.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: graphophobia on April 02, 2018, 11:23:06 PM
Same Firefly, still have Mark's shortbread and Hot Cross bun recipes pinned to the fridge. Other priorities right now, so we may be having our Hot Cross buns in May!
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on April 03, 2018, 01:28:07 PM
You definitely need plenty of time for the bagels. I don't make them very often as they are a bit of a faff, so I need to concentrate too. I always end up with a couple that come undone during the poaching stage!

The soft white rolls, on the other hand, are spectacularly quick and easy. :)
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Firefly on April 03, 2018, 01:30:12 PM
I'm the Queen of easy ways mate, need to get my act together and do them
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on April 15, 2018, 12:48:53 PM
Oat Topped Malthouse Rolls

500g malthouse bread flour
325g tepid water
1 tbsp. sunflower oil
1 tbsp. malt extract
3 tsp. yeast
1.5 tsp. salt

Knead and prove for about 2 hours. make 6 rolls of about 150g each. Brush with water and sprinkle with oats. Prove for about 30 mins. Bake at 210c for 15 - 17 mins.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: graphophobia on April 16, 2018, 10:17:40 PM
Time to get back into some baking, and as we have our first fire of the season on today, those oaty bread rolls are looking like a mighty fine idea to go with homemade soup for dinner. Can I use ordinary bread flour Mark, if I can't get the malthouse? I know I can get malt extract, but not sure about the flour.  :)
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on April 17, 2018, 06:55:12 PM
You could, but it would be very different. The malthouse flour is packed with seeds and grains and has a nice nutty flavour. If you can't get it try this instead:

160g white bread flour
100g   dark rye flour
170g   wholemeal bread flour
280g   water
1 tbsp. sunflower oil
2 tbsp. maple syrup
2 tsp. yeast
1 tsp. salt

This makes 6 rolls of about 135g each, so a bit smaller than the MH ones. Bake for about 24 mins at 210c.

I like them baked really well, so quite dark. I also use a longish 2nd prove - about 50 mins. This gives a great crust and light crumb.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: graphophobia on April 17, 2018, 10:03:28 PM
Thanks Mark, I might have a go at those tonight, they look very tasty. I know I can get rye flour locally, so will use your suggested mix instead.  :)
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on April 18, 2018, 12:36:09 PM
Here's a pic of that roll. They freeze well, so I make batches and take out as needed.

M

PS - vegetarian ham if you are wondering!
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: graphophobia on April 18, 2018, 10:38:17 PM
Thanks to Mark for his delicious roll recipe, they came out beautifully (didn't think about a photo until the last one was half eaten!). Just the ticket with vegetable soup.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Firefly on April 30, 2018, 07:23:54 AM
I haven't looked at this site properly yet. It has a lot of bread recipes so may interest some. I liked a particular sweet and followed a link and saved the site.

http://www.jennycancook.com/recipes/
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: graphophobia on April 30, 2018, 10:23:07 PM
Firefly, they had me at Cinnamon Swirl Raisin bread. :)
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Firefly on May 01, 2018, 05:44:35 AM
 ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on May 01, 2018, 12:05:19 PM
When I find (or buy a new) cheese grater I'll make some cheese scones.  I have a recipe here just crying out to be used.  Once I've tested it I'll post it for you to play with.

My youngest lass made a gluten free version.  Rolled out and cut square to differentiate between full fat and 'gluten free'.

Left click to enlarge.

 
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Firefly on May 01, 2018, 02:18:51 PM
They look good mate, gluten free here leaves a lot to be desired
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: graphophobia on May 02, 2018, 02:44:40 AM
A local lady is nationally famous for the cheese scones she sells. Her advice is, when you think you've added enough cheese, add  a bit more. Words to live by.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Firefly on May 02, 2018, 03:39:33 AM
You can never have too much cheese   ;D
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: graphophobia on May 02, 2018, 11:23:06 PM
Making pumpkin scones this morning, never made those before so hopefully they will be good.  We have a bumper pumpkin harvest this year, and the neighbours are pretending not to be home if I walk up their driveways with a pumpkin. I've considered driving to the nearest town and just leaving them on random doorsteps.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on May 03, 2018, 08:53:32 AM
One of my old neighbours used to grow the most amazing runner beans.  Every third or fourth year they'd throw a bumper crop and he'd roam along the street with a sheaf of the damned things under his arm trying to gt rid of them.

I asked him why he planted so many, or why he didn't stagger his plantings a bit.

"It'd make no difference.  Beans just grow like wildfire for me no matter what I do."  He had the same 'problem' with tomatoes.  Everything else he planted grew in a far more civilised manner ;-)
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on May 03, 2018, 11:20:40 AM
Gluts. It is courgettes for us (I say us, I mean madam of course). At least she only grows one plant these days.

My favourite courgette recipe is patties made with grated and wrung-out courgette, grated parboiled potato, crumbled feta cheese and lots of garden mint. baked until golden and served with roasted cherry tomatoes.  :)
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: graphophobia on May 03, 2018, 10:16:58 PM
Oh good grief, courgettes! I had to cut us back to just the one plant, they grow like rain forest trees here.  The trouble with living in a rural area is all the neighbours have veggie gardens too, so they all have gluts as well. Maybe we should each grow one type of vegetable and share them around?  I've though about putting a 'free vegetables' stall out on the main highway, but we're not allowed to do that these days with rules and regulations being the substitute for common sense.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on May 03, 2018, 11:06:39 PM
You are not allowed to give stuff away?!!
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: graphophobia on May 07, 2018, 12:17:56 AM
 No, we can give stuff away, but when it comes to the State Highways around here, they are very strict about anything that encourages people to slow down, stop or pull over to look at, and I guess with the appalling driving in this country I can understand why. If you want to have anything on the highway, there's a lot of red tape to navigate.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: DGSquared on December 20, 2018, 11:04:40 AM
Food porn and with many words my narrow little mind had never seen before.

I feel fatter by just reading. Ha! If I were a man, that would be a double-entendre. 


So, an Aga, how do they differ in baking from conventional ovens? I have never heard of them before. 
Though we do have 'antique' ovens made of cast iron, no one uses them on the reg, as they say these days.
What would be the American equivalent? A dutch oven, perhaps?

Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Spell Chick on December 20, 2018, 11:55:53 AM
http://www.agaliving.com/aga-range-cookers/how-an-aga-cooker-works
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: DGSquared on December 20, 2018, 12:13:11 PM
Do people buy those here in the states? I've never seen one, that I know of. Just the old fashioned cast iron ovens like my great-grandmother had.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: ST on December 20, 2018, 12:48:46 PM
I know it is the season of sugared treats and such( :P I made lots already - ate lots too :( )  but I also like garlic bread sticks. The thing is I don't want to spend the morning waiting for yeast to do its thing. I did find a recipe that makes great bread sticks and doesn't involve yeast. They are also ready from start to finish in less than an hour, maybe even 45 mins with cooking time.

ingredients

    1-1/4 cups all-purpose flour
    2 teaspoons sugar
    1-1/2 teaspoons baking powder
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    2/3 cup milk
    3 tablespoons butter, melted
    2 teaspoons sesame seeds

Mix all the dry, add the milk, stir stir stir but don't over work.  Press out on a floured surface, I roll it out to about 1/4 in thickness, then use a pizza cutter to divide them into sticks of somewhat equal length. On a cookie sheet I put down the parchment paper(cause I do like that magical stuff) and then spread some of that butter garlic on the paper, placing the dough on after.

To be honest I use way more butter and garlic than they suggest. I also put in a few Italian seasonings just to liven them up more. Back til they become a bit brown on the edges and then when they come out, I put a bit of parm on them.

They triple in thickness, and have the texture like the breadsticks at Olive Garden. If you haven't been there, well, they taste great.

:)

Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Firefly on December 20, 2018, 03:48:41 PM
Sound tasty chef ST  ;D
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Dansinger on December 20, 2018, 04:39:28 PM
I know it is the season of sugared treats and such( :P I made lots already - ate lots too :( )  but I also like garlic bread sticks. The thing is I don't want to spend the morning waiting for yeast to do its thing. I did find a recipe that makes great bread sticks and doesn't involve yeast. They are also ready from start to finish in less than an hour, maybe even 45 mins with cooking time.

These sound good. Gonna have to try to convert them to GF breadsticks.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Spell Chick on December 20, 2018, 05:32:06 PM
What flours do you use for gluten free?

I've been baking with some almond and coconut flours because of carb counts, but I don't know about gluten. Is rice flour gluten free?
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Dansinger on December 20, 2018, 07:14:51 PM
Yes. Rice flour is gluten free. Almond flour, tapioca flour, corn flour, coconut flour, chickpea flour are all gluten free. Actually any flour not containing wheat, barley or rye is (or rather should be) gluten free. Certified GF oat flour and buckwheat flour are also gluten free, but if not certified GF, they might be cross contaminated.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Spell Chick on December 20, 2018, 10:53:07 PM
So I just have to use the most expensive type. Great! I looked at other flours today while out shopping and there are many options for gluten free, but not so many with low carb counts.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Dansinger on December 20, 2018, 11:05:33 PM
It's easy to make your own almond flour. Just grind almonds up in a blender. Coconut flour, not so easy, but it can be done.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Firefly on December 21, 2018, 03:54:58 AM
I have to share this with you guys. I made it last week and loved it. Although it is a chilli jam, it's not hot as you would expect it to be but very flavoursome. Great on steaks, sandwich, toast, oh it's my fave at the minute  ;D

Chilli Jam

Prep time:  10  Minutes              Cooking time:  10-12 Minutes             
 
Makes approximately 3/4 of a cup
 
5 long red chillies, roughly chopped  (you can remove the seeds if you like)
1 french eschalot or 1/2 a small red onion, roughly chopped
3 cloves of garlic, roughly chopped
1 tbs of ginger, roughly chopped
2 tbs of peanut oil (rice bran or canola if you have an allergy to peanuts)
2 tsp of sesame oil
1/4 cup of rice wine vinegar
2 tbs of fish sauce
2/3 cup of brown sugar
 
Place the chilli, garlic, ginger and eschalot in a small food processor and process until finely chopped (like a paste).
 
Heat the peanut oil and sesame oil in a large non stick fry pan to a medium heat and add the chilli mixture.  Cook and stir for approximately 6-8 minutes or until just starting to caramelise.
 
Add the vinegar, fish sauce and brown sugar, stir to combine and allow to bubble away for 3-4 minutes or until slightly thickened.  The chilli jam will thicken on cooling.
 
Allow to cool before transferring to a jar or an airtight container.  The chilli jam will last up to 3 weeks in the fridge.
 
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Amie on December 21, 2018, 08:02:45 AM
Yum - that chilli jam looks gorgeous!! I am making some today.

Re: gluten-free flour, I wonder if oat flour gets a better result than something like almond flour? Oat flour at least seems glutinous, whereas almond flour doesn’t seem to have any stretchy properties at all.

I think I’ve heard xantham gum is a good way to make gluten-free bread more bread-like and less cake-like.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on December 21, 2018, 09:43:51 AM
FF

I like that sound of the jam! I assume replacing the fish sauce with soy would work OK?
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Dansinger on December 21, 2018, 10:44:17 AM
Re: gluten-free flour, I wonder if oat flour gets a better result than something like almond flour? Oat flour at least seems glutinous, whereas almond flour doesn’t seem to have any stretchy properties at all.

Depends on what you're making. But usually you mix several flours for better results.


I think I’ve heard xantham gum is a good way to make gluten-free bread more bread-like and less cake-like.

I'm not a fan of xantham gum. It tends to give your baked goods a gummy texture. I use chia seed, flax seed or eggs as binders. Having said that, I don't really like bread, so I've hardly eaten any since going GF. So I can't really say how well "my" binders would work in bread. The gluten free bread (bought, not home-made; life's too short) I ate so far was about as tasty as a cardboard box. I hear other gluten free bread tastes even worse.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Firefly on December 21, 2018, 10:50:02 AM
FF

I like that sound of the jam! I assume replacing the fish sauce with soy would work OK?

I imagine it would or the coconut amino sauce, they would add a depth mate. It's super delicious
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Amie on December 21, 2018, 07:36:29 PM
This might sound totally crazy (and might be totally wrong), but:  I make fermented vegetables. Sometimes, I add dill. When I ferment vegetables with dill, it tastes a bit fishy to me. Kind of like a battered cod with tartar sauce sort of fishy. I don’t know if that would be enough fishyness, or the right kind of fishyness, but now I’m curious as to whether dill + soy sauce might be less revolting than it sounds, and might be an unexpected replacement for fish sauce?
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Firefly on December 21, 2018, 07:40:41 PM
It certainly would be worth a try Amie. I am not a fish sauce fan but can't taste it in this recipe thankfully.  I remember the first time I smelled it in the bottle I near lost my lunch it was so pungent
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: wanderer on December 21, 2018, 08:17:05 PM
It certainly would be worth a try Amie. I am not a fish sauce fan but can't taste it in this recipe thankfully.  I remember the first time I smelled it in the bottle I near lost my lunch it was so pungent

Talk about "pungent," we had a foreign exchange student from Australia. Her mom sent her some vegemite...that was some bad stuff for the rest of the family. Awful is a kind description.  :)
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Firefly on December 21, 2018, 11:52:41 PM
 ;D

Vegemite  is a breakfast staple in most Aussie homes, can't do Marmite or Promite though
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Spell Chick on December 22, 2018, 01:04:19 PM
(https://static.meijer.com/Media/085/32370/0853237003005_a1c1_0600.png)

I tried these. I had to buy a crate of six packs and they were $15 for all of them. We tried it yesterday. I opened my "noodles" and smelled fish. They said the fish smell would go away with the second step of preparing them. It didn't. They were terrible. We didn't eat them and I threw the other five packages away rather than ruin five more meals.

Do not try these. I even like fish and couldn't stand them. I didn't expect them to be fishy, but here we are.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on December 22, 2018, 01:46:02 PM
Looking at the list of what's not in there I've come to the conclusion they can only be made from processed Vegans.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Firefly on December 22, 2018, 07:06:15 PM
How disappointing on all levels Patti 🤢
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on December 23, 2018, 10:06:58 AM
Looking at the list of what's not in there I've come to the conclusion they can only be made from processed Vegans.

I wondered where all the American (and by American, I only mean the USA, not all the other so-called countries that use the continent) vegans had gone!

I'd like to be a vegan, but it is so so hard  :(
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Dansinger on December 23, 2018, 11:25:13 AM
I'd like to be a vegan, but it is so so hard  :(

 :D

I eat vegan stuff most of the time, but I'm not a vegan and don't aspire to ever become one. I wear leather, I love honey. And eggs, real cheese and even meat and fish are rather nice every once in a while.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on December 23, 2018, 02:32:47 PM
... and even meat and fish are rather nice every once in a while.

Nice is not a factor. The point of vegetarianism is that you put animal welfare ahead of your own pleasures because you feel that such pleasures don't warrant the animals' distress.  :)

M
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Dansinger on December 23, 2018, 07:50:50 PM
And there I thought the point of vegetarianism was to prove your mum wrong.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Spell Chick on December 24, 2018, 12:56:25 AM
I was looking for a diabetes friendly appetizer and found this. I will report back later how it turned out but I'm not doing it exactly as written. I couldn't find apricot jam that was sugar free, but I did find orange marmalade sugar free, so I'm using that instead. Oh, and I have a different brand of prosciutto.

Glazed Prosciutto Wrapped Water Chestnuts

Servings: 12 to 16

Ingredients
10 slices Fiorucci Prosciutto
2 cans (8 oz each) whole water chestnuts, drained
1/4 cup apricot jam
2 tsp chopped fresh rosemary

Directions
Slice prosciutto into quarters; wrap one piece around each water chestnut and secure with a toothpick. Place on foil-lined or parchment paper-lined baking sheet.

In small saucepan, heat apricot jam with rosemary over medium heat for 2 or 3 minutes or until melted; brush over prosciutto. Bake in oven at 375°F for 20 to 25 minutes or until edges of prosciutto are crisp and glaze is bubbling.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Dansinger on December 24, 2018, 11:23:43 AM
Sounds good, Spell. I need to get started on tomorrow's soup now. I'm making courgette soup. Because I've got two courgettes lying around in the kitchen and I'd hate to see them go bad. (I've already got a kiwi that needs to go to an AA meeting, and no idea what to do with it yet. Froze it for now. I guess it'll end up in a chutney. With the last of the apples from Dad's apple tree, as those buggers have gone all wrinkly.)

So courgette soup it is. And I need to make a bottle of breakfast smoothie. Because I love a nice, tasty breakfast ready for the grabbing. Damn, that looks like so much work!  :o
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Dansinger on December 24, 2018, 02:27:15 PM
Courgette soup (gluten free, soy free, nut free, low salt, vegan)

Sounds like it can't be any good, eh? But it actually tastes quite nice, and is surprisingly easy to make.

Servings: depends on appetite

Ingredients:
2 courgettes
1/2 cup brown rice
water
bouillon powder (vegan for vegan option, low salt for low salt option)

Directions:
Rinse rice, wash and cube courgettes. Throw in a large saucepan. Add water. Bring to boil, lower temperature, leave bubbling until rice is done.

Turn off the heat. Add bouillon powder to taste.

Blend in a blender or use an immersion blender. (I actually prefer to use the immersion blender. Less washing up afterwards.)

Easy peasy.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Spell Chick on December 25, 2018, 11:41:02 AM
I had to look up what a courgette was. It's a zucchini. Who knew?


The wrapped water chestnuts were tasty, but were more work than wrapping with some bacon that isn't so delicate.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Dansinger on December 25, 2018, 10:44:24 PM
I had to look up what a courgette was. It's a zucchini. Who knew?

You Americans have such funny names for your vegetables. Zucchini for courgette, eggplant for aubergine. Don't you guys know that eggs don't grow on plants?
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Spell Chick on December 25, 2018, 10:59:24 PM
We doesn't do skool gooder.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Dansinger on December 25, 2018, 11:02:04 PM
Well, that explains everything.  ;D
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: indar9 on January 30, 2019, 04:42:28 AM
I've been experimenting with olive oils lately. An area of California back-country is ideal for olive groves. The Temecula Olive Oil Company sells infused oils. I like the lemon but that is seasonal so I settled for blood orange infused recently and discovered it's fabulous on sweet potatoes. I cut the lighter color sweet potatoes in strips (peel on) brush them with the oil, roast them on a baking sheet in the oven at 350 degrees F maybe 20-30 minutes or until they brown a little on the edges and are soft in the middle. The peel comes right off. They are soooo good for you.

Wish I'd noticed this thread earlier---I'm a foodie.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Firefly on January 30, 2019, 11:19:58 AM
I love the infused oils Indar, I always have chilli, garlic and lemon or lime around, never seen blood orange, that would be amazing

I like the sound of the sweet potato strips too
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Amie on January 31, 2019, 01:08:38 AM
Re: sweet potatoes, the peel is edible, just like for regular potatoes.

Surprisingly, some varieties of squashes and pumpkins also have edible peels /rinds. Not all of them, but a surprising number. I get a big box of squashes every year around Christmas time, and about 75% of them have very tasty rinds when roasted.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Firefly on January 31, 2019, 03:01:02 AM
If you get big ones, like forearm size, cut in half, stuff them with a mince or vege mix bolognese style with cheese on top and bake about half hour, very very tasy
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: indar9 on January 31, 2019, 04:45:15 PM
 I make a dish that evolved from a Ratatouille recipe many years ago. I grow my own eggplant (I know, aubergine)---in the US we call it Japanese eggplant which is the long skinny kind: the peel is thin and tender and can be left on. All summer squash has a good thin skin. But Amie, I don't like the flavor of sweet potato skin. Maybe if its boiled and mashed---I do that with regular potatoes, the peel provides a little texture.

 I love winter squash and am about to try a recipe for acorn squash stuffed with grains and veggies. I'll post it if it turns out as good as I think it will. I don't cook with recipes very often, and when I do it doesn't take long until I've modified it a lot.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Amie on January 31, 2019, 04:46:44 PM
Oh, I eat all the aubergine skins. It’s never occurred to me to peel them.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on January 31, 2019, 08:47:10 PM
Nor me.  I love roasted aubergine, but without the skins, you'd just have a plate of mush.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: indar9 on February 01, 2019, 12:56:26 AM
I've never roasted them---how do you do that? I only saute them with zucchini, bell pepper slices. onion and tomatoes--in lots of olive oil
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on February 01, 2019, 07:33:41 AM
Like this:

Cook some puy lentils in stock and set aside.

Heat some olive oil in a big roasting pan.

Cube: Aubergine, courgette
Quarter: a red onion and a couple of red peppers, a dozen smallish mushrooms
Add to the pan and toss in a punnet of cherry tomatoes and 8 cloves of garlic, still in skins but walloped to loosen skins.
Salt and pepper
Drizzle with more oil
Roast in a hot oven until the veg starts to char

Mix the roasted veg with the lentils and dress with more oil, plus balsamic vinegar. Season to taste.

Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: indar9 on February 02, 2019, 10:44:09 PM
I've heard that long (and, I'm certain, inaccurate) saying about heaven and hell as it pertains to some European countries. In heaven the English are the diplomats, the French are the cooks, the German are the organizers and the Italians are the lovers.

In hell the Italians are the organizers, the Germans are the lovers, the French are the diplomats and the English are the cooks. Well I kind of suspected the assignments were along US misconceptions. Your recipe sounds like some real good cooking. I'll try it and thanks.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on February 03, 2019, 08:57:46 AM
Because we (the English) are so diplomatic we tend not to point out that English food, our very cosmopolitan food, is better than French or German.  :)
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Firefly on February 09, 2019, 07:31:41 AM
We have a TV show  here called the Cook and the Chef and today he showed how to make Dosa but did the whole fermentation process. I had not heard of this  before so found a Youtube video on how to sort of make it, no where near as interesting as his. Lentils and rice is the base, I will try to find it online. It was one of those sourbread type of processes that you fed the mixture onto the next batch

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gz0nFgkrgEQ
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: indar9 on March 08, 2019, 01:22:44 AM
https://www.kelloggs.com/en_US/recipes/the-original-all-bran-muffins-recipe.html

I just recently thought of a recipe I made 40-50 years ago when my kids were little. Great breakfast idea. Bless the internet--The recipe lives! I'm going to make these again.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on March 08, 2019, 10:01:55 AM
If you get big ones, like forearm size, cut in half, stuff them with a mince or vege mix bolognese style with cheese on top and bake about half hour, very very tasy

I remember these from the caravan years.  Dad used to grow marrows and Mum cooked them the way you've described.  If a marrow got too big she did much the same but cut it into rings before adding the other ingredients.

There was never any left over, so we must have enjoyed them.

I also remember how we were allowed to scratch our names on a marrow when it was still small and the white scar grew with the marrow.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Firefly on March 09, 2019, 05:35:38 AM
The things that make a warm memory mate
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Firefly on March 27, 2019, 02:12:41 AM
After a discussion in another thread about American biscuits and Aussie/Pommie scones, I thought I would throw up a recipe I use on the road to whip up a quick batch without all the usual hoo haa. These are seriously yum, you can use plain soda water or ginger beer, any soda really, depending on your taste buds. The video is quick but fairly tongue in cheek, you'll get the drift

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RiINsfyYlZ4
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Dansinger on March 27, 2019, 08:49:55 AM
Gonna have to try that, FF. Looks amazing.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on March 27, 2019, 10:05:21 AM
I must have a stab at that using ginger beer ;-)

On a bizarre note I wonder if using Irn Bru would create 'orangey' looking scones.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Firefly on March 27, 2019, 08:57:51 PM
Had to look that up Gyp  ;D
I've known some to make them on the red Creaming Soda we have in Oz and they had a pinkish tinge.
Dan they are the only scones I make successfully, the rest are door stops  :P
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on March 27, 2019, 09:51:04 PM
You definitely need the heat to make them 'jump' in the oven.  440F or 220C isn't too hot.

I watched another video of a woman making the 'lemonade scones and I nearly fell asleep.  The way she described it was almost a religious ritual.  Typically pretentious chef ;-)
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Dansinger on March 27, 2019, 10:11:12 PM
Was that the 18-minute video, Gyp? I started to watch that too. It was dead boring.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on March 27, 2019, 11:08:39 PM
Sounds about right.  Lady with immaculate make-up, who stared at the camera?
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Firefly on March 28, 2019, 03:39:38 AM
3 ingredient cooking doesn't need any longer than a 1.5 minute video now does it  ;D ;D
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Dansinger on March 28, 2019, 07:23:35 AM
Sounds about right.  Lady with immaculate make-up, who stared at the camera?

The very same.


3 ingredient cooking doesn't need any longer than a 1.5 minute video now does it  ;D ;D

My thoughts exactly. Gonna need to buy me some fizzy so I can make this.

Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on January 09, 2020, 01:06:24 AM
Been a bit busy today so I made use of the slowcooker.  Made a classic 'use what's in the house' slow-cooker casserole today.

Used a whole tin of Sainsbury's 'Five Beans' (other makes are doubtless similar).  Added a little bit of water, but not much.

Half a dozen small potatoes cut into chunks, washed but with the skins still on.

Two rashers of bacon cut into bits roughly (very roughly) an inch square.  Could have used more, but that was what I had left in the fridge

I intended to throw in a chopped up carrot as well, but forgot it until too late.

Cooked for one hour on high to get it going, and then it sat for about five hours on low heat.  Stirred it a couple of times.  Once after the initial hour, and again about halfway through.

Result?  Rather tasty.  Would have been nice with a side dish of rice, or possibly with some spaghetti/pasta  added in for the last couple of hours.

=====

It caught in a couple of places on the side of the crockpot, but washed off easily enough so it wasn't burnt.

Definitely going on my list of easy meals for a busy day.

Made a decent portion for one, and came about halfway up the sides of my small slowcooker.

Next time I might throw in a handful of sultanas as well in the last hour or so.  They just get lost if they're in there all the way through.

=====

Really intend to make a boiled bacon pudding some day soon.  Need to do it before the date on the Atora suet runs out ;-)  Traditional gypsy pudding, boiled in a cloth.  The sort of thing which cooks all day whilst you're out working.

===
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Firefly on January 10, 2020, 05:48:30 AM
All sounds rather tasty mate. I have a fridge full of stuff that could do with a cook up, might run mine for tomorrow night

That Gypsy one sounds rather good too
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on January 12, 2020, 03:30:37 PM
Experimenting with brown rice in the slow cooker today.  Found a bag of the stuff in the store cupboard and decided to give it a go.  Cooking it on its own today, just to see what happens.  I'll let you know how it turns out.

Well-rinsed to prevent any loose starch making it sticky.

Anyone have any slow-cooked rice experience to share?

Gyppo

UPDATE:  Brown basmati rice cooked up nicely with one hour on high and a second hour on slow.  Water about an inch above the level of the rice.  All I added was a pinch of salt and small knob of margarine (would have used butter if there was any in the house) to help prevent it sticking.

After the second hour it was pretty damned ready  (nice and fluffy after a quick stir with a fork.  Very little clumping.)

The water level need topping up if I wanted to cook it any more.  So I scooped out some to test, (rather nice), and added more water for a further experiment.  I wouldn't be surprised if this makes it too watery, but there's only one way to find out.

Gyppo

PS:  It smells good too.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Firefly on January 12, 2020, 06:46:07 PM
I do good old porcupine meatballs in the slow cooker, takes about 6 hours on low to cook the rice that way.

Quite often throw a handful in a lot of stew type of meals to thicken them up a bit.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on January 12, 2020, 07:38:04 PM
The rice  - cooked alone -  was ready after only two hours. One high and one low.  The extra half hour overcooked it.

So now I know, for that particular rice at least.  So I'm guessing three hours on low would be about the same.

I served it up with the remainder from yesterday's casserole thingy and it was quite acceptable.  Went well with a 0.00% Heineken.

I took a photo, but for some reason the computer isn't 'seeing' the camera.  After all these years of it just performing faultlessly it's being a pain.  I will look into this later.

I shall discard the surplus rice this time, but now I have an idea how long and how much water it needs I will be cooking it again.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Firefly on January 13, 2020, 10:38:20 AM
Rice freezes well too mate, as does pasta
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on January 13, 2020, 11:15:36 AM
I shall cook up a bigger helping next time, then bag and freeze it in portion sizes.  But if I do too much of that I'll need a bigger freezer. There's  a downside to everything ;-)

I'll be looking for some rectangular containers that will stack or 'file sideways' like books on a shelf.

I inherited a wonderful collection of bowls with lids from Mum, but they waste a lot of space.  And sadly they're not micro-wave safe.

Having fun though ;-)
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Firefly on January 14, 2020, 08:22:29 PM
Gyp invest in a vacuum seal machine. When you work out sizes etc of servings, vac seal you food (semi freeze anything with liquid) and saves space, lasts longer and no freezer burn.

They are reasonably priced these days and bags are easy found online
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on January 14, 2020, 08:45:02 PM
I'll look into that.

The food parcel I buy in every three weeks or so is vacuum packed stuff.

My Sis was fascinated to learn that you can slow-cook rice.

Gyppo
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Firefly on January 15, 2020, 01:04:34 AM
 ;D ;D

Try doing a creamed rice dish in it, so smooth and lush

We vac pack heaps for our trips and is as good as when it was first cooked.

Bought his mum one for a trip she took last year, she vac packs cold meats and all
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on January 19, 2020, 08:31:48 PM
Invested in an electric skillet.  Effectively a square frying pan with sides about two inches tall.  About a square foot of cooking area.  With a glass lid so I can see the sausages burning ;-)

Also invested in a bottle of one-cal spray 'oil', as recommended by the girl at the railway station buffet.  She said a little goes a long way on a non-stick surface.  So far I'm impressed with both skillet and spray.  Probably used a little too much of the latter, but better safe than sorry with a new pan.

First test was a simple fried egg.  When I went to turn it over I was sharply reminded of the devious nature of non-stick pans.  Especially when it slid effortlessly up the sides as I tried to trap it in the corner ;-)

A couple of nylon spatulas and some nylon kitchen tongs are on my shopping list.   I have wooden spatulas but they're a bugger to keep clean, and I always preferred the tongs for turning bacon etc.

The egg turned out lovely though.

Because of the two handles the skillet is a bit big to leave on the work surface, which had been my original plan, but I've cleared a handy shelf so I can put it away safely but easy to find.  The slow cooker is small enough to stay on the worktop, although it may have a small shelf of its own one day.  Both cables are earmarked for shortening.

Today I cooked up some bacon.  The skillet is big enough to take four slices, which will be useful if I want to feed my daughter at the same time.  The surprise bonus was that the bacon doesn't shrink as much as it does in the microwave.  Two rashers make a well filled sandwich, as opposed to three in the microwave.  Plus the microwave bacon tray will only hold three and is a total bugger to clean afterwards.

Whilst all this was cooking I slung together my beans and bacon slow-cooker casserole for this evening, and tomorrow.

=====

I'll have  stab at making pancakes in the griddle soon.  I've been buying prepacked microwaveable pancakes off and on, but the last few always dry out and get crinkly at the edges before I can use up a six-pack.

Also plan to have a stab at some wholemeal crumpets using the skillet as a hotplate.  Haven't made crumpets since I was at tech college more than half a century ago ;-)  That'll be a trip down memory lane.

=====

I'm still getting to grips with cooking for one, but my slightly shrinking waistline suggests I'm winning.

=====

The next slow-cooked sausage casserole will contain venison sausages.   Mum used to make that sometimes in the family sized crockpot.

=====

Scrambled eggs and french toast will be coming back onto the menu.  It's possible to make reasonably edible scramble eggs in the microwave, but it's not perfect.

Having fun with my new toy ;-)

Gyppo
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on January 19, 2020, 09:39:38 PM
Try pikelets instead of crumpets. They look a bit odd but you get a greater surface area so more room for whatever you put on them.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on January 19, 2020, 10:16:43 PM
You have a point there, Mark.

I make square(ish) scones because I don't have a set of cutters ;-)
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on January 25, 2020, 10:15:42 PM
Field testing the new electric skillet a few days ago.  Can't beat an egg for testing if a pan will stick.  Passed with flying colours.

Cooked a few other things in there since.  Cooks well at lower temperatures without spitting.

A worthwhile investment.

Left click if you're that interested.

Gyppo
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Firefly on January 26, 2020, 09:01:05 AM
Ah it's an electric one mate, neat
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on January 26, 2020, 10:07:53 AM
No gas here.  There's a supply to the bungalow if I want it, (and a gas camping stove in the garage for emergencies, (or for melting lead outdoors), but I got used to cooking on electricity in the house.  Having been flung across the bakery by a gas explosion whilst I was only an apprentice I'm still not truly comfortable using it.  No physical scars, but...

Skillet sits nicely on a shelf to one side of the work surface when not in use.  It gets a bit crowded if both the slow-cooker and the skillet are in use at the same time.

Have fallen in love with the olive oil pan spray.  The girl from the railway buffet gave good advice ;-)

Dined like a lord on bean and sausage casserole last night ;-)

Gyppo
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on January 26, 2020, 12:13:34 PM
Here's my bacon and bean casserole.  My standard one makes enough for two meals.  Half  gets eaten just 'as is'.  The other half goes in the fridge and is served up with rice.  It's quite spicy and goes well with a bottle of non-alcoholic lager.  Or even just sparkling water when the lager runs out.

Turns a meal into an occasion rather than just 'fuel for the body' ;-)

Definitely 'fillling'.
Title: Tonight's Culinary experiment. Spicy Pigs
Post by: Gyppo on January 26, 2020, 10:18:20 PM
My variation on piggies in a blanket.

Spicy pigs (Salami in puff pastry.)  Left click to enlarge

If you want the instructions, just ask.

Just tried one now they've cooled down a little and it's rather tasty.

TIP:  You could use a rather potent salami because the pastry takes some of the bite out of it.

Title: Re: Tonight's Culinary experiment. Spicy Pigs
Post by: MiggsEye on February 08, 2020, 07:50:42 PM
My variation on piggies in a blanket.

Spicy pigs (Salami in puff pastry.)  Left click to enlarge

If you want the instructions, just ask.

Just tried one now they've cooled down a little and it's rather tasty.

TIP:  You could use a rather potent salami because the pastry takes some of the bite out of it.

Presently, I'm on a ketogenic diet. Pastry and bread are enemies of ketosis. While there's often decent keto substitutes for "carby' pleasures, I've never found a keto substitute for puff pastry crust and it's buttery flakiness. I'll just have to put this tasty looking recipe in my bookmarks, Gyppo, and make it when return to a higher carb diet.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on February 08, 2020, 11:29:17 PM
They're best eaten within a couple of days otherwise the salami dries out as the moisture migrates into the pastry.  Eat hot or cold, but reheating doesn't do them any favours.

Gyppo
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on February 21, 2020, 04:15:43 PM
Once a thing irritates you enough then it's time to fix it.   This job has taken about two years since I first thought about it ;-)

I get pissed off when even a small bag of spuds starts to sprout before I'm halfway through it.  They come from the shop in a plastic bag which positively encourages them to sprout.

Yesterday, having bought a new bag of spuds which aren't sprouting, I threw together a quick cloth bag to keep them tucked away in the darkness.

"One bag to rule them all, and in the darkness bind them."

I was going to use a leg cut from an old pair of Cammo trousers, but when I looked in the 'rag draw' I found a solitary jeans leg.  Even better, nice thick denim.

It took a sacking needle and some sturdy nylon netting twine to seal off the wider non-hemmed end.  Long time since I've done any heavy duty stitching.  Six layers of folded denim is about as tough as leather, and my fingers ached afterwards.

No need for a draw string closure, I just roll it up around the contents.  Plenty big enough when you're only catering for one.

Ventilated, damn near light proof, and washable if I ever have a bad slimy spud in there.  Unlikely you if you take a few seconds to check whilst transferring them from the plastic.

Left click to enlarge.

Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on February 21, 2020, 04:17:53 PM
And just for the sake of completion, here it is rolled around a couple of pounds of spuds.

Left click to enlarge.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Spell Chick on February 21, 2020, 05:40:49 PM
Even lazier.

I buy a small bag (3 pounds or 1.5 kilo) of fingerling to tiny potatoes. I dice them up. In a plastic bag, I shake the diced potatoes with a drizzle of olive oil, salt, and whatever spices move me at the moment. These have garlic and rosemary added.

Bake at 425 degrees F for 25 to 35 minutes. Then we eat them quickly reheated in the microwave. They last for about two weeks in the refrigerator without molding.

I do the same thing with a sweet potato, but I add the olive oil and salt along with a sprinkling of cinnamon. Not the sugar added kind, just plain ground cinnamon. They take a little longer to bake, but that might be because I cut them into bigger chunks.

I also peel the sweet potatoes and I would if I used a russet or Idaho for the regular ones, but the fingerlings I leave the peel on.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on February 21, 2020, 07:38:15 PM
I'll try that.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Firefly on February 22, 2020, 04:49:15 AM
Sweet potato is magic with butter and cinnamon sugar, just a light sprinkle, adds something magical
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Spell Chick on February 24, 2020, 05:21:08 PM
Sausage spinach bean soup

1 tsp minced garlic
4 cups chicken broth
15 oz can great northern beans, rinsed
1 pound Italian sausage (I used sweet)
1 tsp basil
15 oz can diced tomatoes
10 oz frozen spinach, thawed
1 cup shredded carrots

Cook sausage and then saute garlic in pan drippings
 
Add carrots, beans, and chicken broth, bring to a boil, and cook until carrots are tender

Add rest of ingredients and heat through.

Serve topped with some Parmesan cheese
serves 8

This turned out to be delicious. I was a little worried when I dumped the spinach in, but lo and behold, it worked.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Firefly on February 24, 2020, 10:04:29 PM
Looks like another winner than mate
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on February 24, 2020, 10:59:41 PM
I must be getting used to feeding myself.

I was round at the local shops, buying a few essentials between rainstorms, when I noticed the chip shop was open.  So I treated myself to unplanned fish and chips.

A couple of hours later I was sat there feeling something was missing.  Eventually it dawned on me that I hadn't cooked anything.  One of the landmarks of my day was missing.

Quite often now I think about my evening meal when I wake up, and put one of the ingredient on prominent display in the kitchen to remind me of my plans.

Sure enough, when I went through to make a drink there was a tin of baked beans next to the kettle.

Gyppo
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Firefly on February 24, 2020, 11:18:01 PM
 ;D ;D

Good idea doing that mate. So many times I forget my intentions till it's too late
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Spell Chick on February 24, 2020, 11:33:31 PM
I started writing out a weekly meal plan. It is very minimal.

today: Gerry's soup and salad
Tomorrow: same thing cuz there are leftovers
Wednesday: chicken (that's it and I have no current idea what that will actually be, but that's the plan
Thursday: shrimp on the barbie
etc.

It is nothing earth shaking, but it helps me use up leftovers. I select a real recipe if it is needed along the way and then can make sure I have everything in the house.

If something comes up and we get off track, I either move stuff a day or just skip that day altogether.

It has been helpful for me.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Firefly on February 25, 2020, 02:32:09 AM
I did a lot of that before we moved, I will get back into it eventually
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on March 02, 2020, 11:14:09 PM
I did a variation on my spicy beans, sweetcorn, and bacon casserole tonight.  The firm do the same beans, still in a thick tomato sauce but without the spice.  I bought a couple of cans on the last shopping run to try them out.

Couldn't resist the temptation to grind a generous helping of freshly cracked black pepper in there before putting the lid on the slow cooker.

Rather nice without being too spicy.

Half of it is in a tub cooling down and destined for the freezer.  Bought myself some handy sized rectangular tubs so they don't take up unnecessary space in the freezer like the round ones.  Will definitely stack two high, possibly three.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Firefly on March 03, 2020, 10:42:39 PM
Good to have some on hand mate for the lazy days
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on March 07, 2020, 07:59:45 AM
Unfroze and cooked the second half of my venison casserole last night. 

Gouty knees overnight.  It looks as if my earlier fears about venison coming into the 'rich food' trigger category may be right.

The only other thing in there which I don't normally eat is cranberries, because I used venison and cranberry sausages.  The butcher also does venison and pork sausages, without any cranberries.  In a week or so when the pain has worn off I'll make a casserole with a couple of them and see if it happens again.

It will be a bummer if I have to give up a recently rediscovered liking.

For today I'll drink a lot of water and hobble around like an old man.

Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Firefly on March 07, 2020, 11:19:09 AM
That is painful I am told mate, recover quickly  :-*
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on May 13, 2020, 02:08:39 PM
A warm salad of roasted cauliflower and cherry tomatoes, with steamed asparagus on a bed of green lentils. Dressed with olive oil and balsamic.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: DGSquared on May 16, 2020, 06:13:06 AM
Yum. What do you roast the cauliflower and tomatoes in?
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on May 16, 2020, 06:18:39 AM
Olive oil, in separate tins. Seasoned and with s sprinkle of dried oregano on the tomatoes.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: DGSquared on May 16, 2020, 09:20:04 PM
Ah. I wouldn't have thought to do them separately.  I can't remember the last time I sauteed tomatoes.  :o

My husband thought it odd that a big slice of beefy tomato from a West Virginia garden was served with every supper we had at Granny's house until he tasted one. The only way to get good tasting beefy tomatoes is to grow them yourself in dark, rich soil.

Do you and Amanda grow veggies and herbs yourself or do you have a decent garden market?
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on May 16, 2020, 11:08:45 PM
Amanda grows them. I don't do gardening. Life's too short.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Dansinger on July 11, 2020, 07:13:44 PM
I had chili for lunch. With enough leftover for at least two suppers.

Then I started thinking about what to do with my last potatoes. I had a whole cabbage as well, so I figured colcannon might be a good idea. Now, I never made - or, in fact, even had - that before, but if you know the Dutch "recipe" for potatoes with cabbage... it's plain boring, and I don't like boring.

So, I started searching the internet, because I wanted to make it in the Instant Pot. Found several recipes, all of them quite similar. I picked on and decided I was going to make that.

Then the "what ifs" came.

What if I added curry powder? What if I added raisins? And cashews?

Whisky? But I only had Scotch whisky, not Irish, so that was a no-go.

Anyway, it came out well. Topped it with some freshly grated mature Cheddar. The orange kind, because I still had some. It was delicious. And again, with enough leftover for another two suppers.

So that's four of my evening meals for next week settled. Not bad.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Laura on July 11, 2020, 08:54:59 PM
I tried a new recipe for Olive & Sun-dried tomato bread today. It did not disappoint.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on August 16, 2020, 07:48:01 AM
We still have a glut of beetroot. We have lots of recipes for it, but last night I invented a new one which worked really well.

It sounds a bit shocking so you will just have to trust me that it works. It is Beetroot Macaroni Cheese  :o

I cut the beet up into smallish cubes and steamed them in the microwave. Then I mixed them in with the macaroni and other veg at the point you add the cheese sauce.

The other veg was: Onion (from the garden), courgette (from the garden), mushrooms (bought). and of course masses of garlic.

The colour bleeds (pun intended) into the sauce, but when it comes out of the oven, it is a nice deep red rather than pink.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: DGSquared on September 14, 2020, 10:20:47 AM
"The other veg" is not descriptive enough. I need measurements.


I learned how to bake garlic this year and squeeze all of its goodness into twice baked potatoes. It was delicious!
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on September 14, 2020, 12:30:10 PM
1 onion. 1 small courgette. 12 mushrooms. 6 cloves of garlic.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on October 04, 2020, 03:12:18 PM
Having finally lost patience with the pathetic little scale pan on the springer scales I inherited from Mum, which would only weight up 2 lbs anyway, I've finally treated myself to a set of electronic scales which can handle up to 11 lbs.  They can also be set for metric weights and liquid measures.

Because of the greater capacity I can also use them to weigh lead, or resin and hardener for mixing, etc.  The 'tare' setting will allow me to mix the latter in a disposable container, and not lose any that sticks to the pan or measuring jug.

Another real advantage is that being a very flat and stable platform scale, only 3/4" thick, it is nowhere near as easily tipped over as the old one.

I did of course check them for accuracy using my old brass weights from the bakery, where we used 'proper' drop scales.  And herein is the one fly in the ointment.  It will weight down to .1 (10th) of an ounce, but with only one decimal place in the display it can't show me a 1/4 oz.  I have a 1/4 oz brass weight  which we sometimes needed for various spices etc.

Instead it does its little best, alternately fluctuating between .2 and .3.

If I ever really need a quarter ounce I'll just weight out a half and divide it visually.

=====

I shall probably put it a real test in the coming week, making up some shortbread from a scaled down version of my old commercial recipe.

=====

Finally it comes with a fifteen year guarantee, which is more than I do.

Gyppo

Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on October 28, 2020, 05:55:49 PM
Finally used my new scales.  First to weigh some fabric and work out how much dye it will need.

Secondly, to make some shortbread.  It's been a long time since my bungalow smelt of baking.  I had no plain flour so I used self raising, which is not ideal, but needs must when the mood is upon me.

Result one thickish slab, ready to be cut into fingers after it's cooled.  Next time I'll double the ingredients - with plain flour - and fill the tray.  That way it won't flow to one side as it softens a little in the heat before 'setting'.

Left click to enlarge

Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on October 28, 2020, 06:26:57 PM
Why does the picture say shirtbread? Don't you have a sieve?
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on October 28, 2020, 07:02:58 PM
Because I'm and idiot and didn't check the name was spelt properly.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on October 28, 2020, 07:33:44 PM
That's not as interesting as I'd hoped.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on October 28, 2020, 09:46:18 PM
Sorry ;-)
Title: Re: Cookbook time; OCD sandwich making ;-)
Post by: Gyppo on December 01, 2020, 11:30:09 PM
Took the simple approach to lunch today, made what I call OCD sarnies.  As opposed to just slapping something together as quick 'fuel' for the body.  Having been carefully assembled they then tend to be eaten in a more leisurely fashion.  Sometimes it's good to slow down, and re-set your day.

=====

    A vegetarian moment.  Attention to detail.  And they tasted good.

    Tiger Bread, slices 'mirrored' to make an even sandwich from lop-sided slices.  Freshly sliced vacuum pack boiled beetroot, precisely laid out on Red Leicester Cheese.

    Looked almost good enough to eat.  So I did ;-)

    If I was after a food magazine photograph I'd present them on a dark coloured plate for contrast, maybe even one with a fancy shape, square or triangular.

Left click if you want to enlarge the picture.

Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on December 02, 2020, 07:27:38 AM
Did you make the tiger bread?

I've never tried it. I have a recipe but not got round to it yet.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on December 02, 2020, 09:30:01 AM
I have to admit the loaf was shop-bought.  I've made tiger bread in the past though, so if you ever get around to trying it here's a few hints. 

Don't skimp on the 'tiger paste' which you paint over it before baking.  In fact let it dry a bit and apply an extra coating.  This is what gives it the different taste, and some commercial offerings are a bit lacking. due to the rush, rush, rush.

Working at home on a single loaf or a small batch you have less pressure, so spoil yourself.  It's worth the extra time.

It's usually worth a little bit longer in the oven as well.  But keep an eye on it over the last few minutes though as smaller ovens can be a bit 'sudden' towards the end of baking.  From nicely crusty to burnt in the time it takes to answer the doorbell ;-(  Burnt tiger has an unpleasant smell.

It keeps well,lasting several days if you keep the cut end covered. and still tastes good even if the last part has dried out a bit.

It doesn't toast well though.  Quite disappointing in that respect.

Gyppo
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Spell Chick on December 02, 2020, 02:50:34 PM
Thanks British Bakers. I had never heard of Tiger Bread and had to look it up. Sounds delicious. I don't think we have anything like that over here unless we do in the big cities or something.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on December 02, 2020, 05:31:50 PM
Gyppo

Do you put the paste on before the second prove or just before baking? I've seen both suggested.

Patti

I bet they have it in San Francisco!

M
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on December 02, 2020, 06:52:17 PM
We put it on just before baking.  Never tried it the other way, so can't offer a comparison.

When we gave it two coats the first one went on about ten to fifteen minutes before the second one.  Rather inconvenient if you're making a lot of them.  Lots of taking trays out of the prover, 'painting' them, sliding them back in, and then repeating.  The double-coating is not a particularly viable process commercially.  Pretty much a non-starter in a big 'plant' bakery where it's a continuous process from mixer to oven.

In a small bakery with more human involvement they'd probably still prefer to do it only once if the result seemed 'satisfactory'.

Gyppo
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Spell Chick on December 02, 2020, 11:40:36 PM
It's almost as close to England as it to San Francisco. I need something closer, but I can't eat more than a half slice no matter what. Le sigh.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on December 03, 2020, 07:42:11 AM
For my baker friends.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on December 03, 2020, 09:21:29 AM
The only time I ever made Stollen was at Tech College, and that joke was old even then.  Still makes me smile though.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on December 07, 2020, 03:06:30 PM
For lunch today I had two home-made 'veggie rolls'.  I made a small batch (8) of these as an experiment yesterday - and an excuse to finally 'christen' my new baker's apron ;-)

No photo this time, but I'll take one the next time I cook them.

Nothing too exotic, just puff pastry rolled around a vegetable filling as if making a sausage roll.  With the seam on the bottom so they wouldn't fly open and puff up too much.  (I could hear the old head baker's Scottish voice.  "A side seal sausage roll is a gobby great thing, difficult to get your mouth around."

I sealed the ends too, so the veggies would get nicely steamed inside whilst the pastry was baking.  The pastry was rolled quite thin because I didn't want too much puff and bulk.  (Next time I may made a small mix of plain shortcrust and try that.)

The filling, this time, was simply bean sprouts, (classic stir-fry supermarket stuff), some chopped up fine green beans and some finely diced carrot.  Both of these were frozen.  Had the carrots been fresh  I may have been tempted to grate a couple instead.  I like steamed carrots, and they add a nice touch of colour.

The bean sprouts were a bit 'unruly' when I laid out the mix on the pastry, so next time I might chop them a bit too

I stirred it all up with a spoonful of olive oil just to make sure the filling stayed moist during baking.  If you like favoured oils I'm sure they'd work just as well.

On another occasion I might throw in a bit of chopped ham or bacon, and some cheese.  This has the potential to be one of those infinitely variable meals.  Like 'Traveller Stew'.

I egg-washed them to give a bit of colour during baking, stabbed them three times on the top so the steam could vent a little and not blow them open, and then slipped each one into a plastic bag so they wouldn't stick together in the freezer.  (this is well worth the time taken,  unless you enjoy trying to separate things which have frozen together in one unwieldy lump.

It took about fifteen minutes from start to finish, including clean-up.  It wouldn't take much longer to make twice as many if I had a bigger freezer.  I'm still looking for the right one at the right price.

Today I baked two of them from frozen, for thirty minutes, and forgot to give them a second egg-wash which would have improved the colour.

But they tasted good.

Gyppo
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on January 12, 2021, 12:39:39 PM
   Playing with pastry.

   I had a pack of pre-sheeted (ready rolled) puff pastry which had gone past its 'use by' date.  (I'm surprised how long these commercial products are supposed to last as long as the packaging stays sealed.  But after the old school baker's 'sniff test', (if it smells vinegary it's dubious) I decided to play with it anyway.  But not for eating.

   I have no round cutters, except a flimsy plastic fluted set which I don't like using.

   I decided to make a square (ish) vol-au-vent as a 'proof of concept' trial. It took  25 minutes to bake @200c.

   Cutting a whole bunch of these by hand would be tedious, but making up a square cutter wouldn't be difficult if you wanted to.

   I don't approve of the modern 'quick' way of making vol-au-vents where you cut out a double thickness, cut the inner circle to half the depth, and then just push it in after they've baked.  This makes a claggy lump in the bottom, and also doesn't give you anything to use as a 'lid'.  Very poor practice.  To me a savoury vol-au-vent is incomplete without its little pastry 'lid' perched on top of the filling.

   Lazy pastry-work like this usually requires you to put the 'cheats' wire grid over the top to keep everything level as well.  (When you're working on a commercial scale and the end result has to fit in standard-sized packaging this is essential.)

   But when you're making a few of something at home then you can damned well do it properly and appreciate the differences.

   If you roll the pastry a little bit thinner for the bases, and then cut out the rings from slightly thicker puff you can stick them together with egg wash.  It takes longer but they look better.  They also won't have the Burger King stripes on the shiny brown egg-glazed surface.  But each to his own.

   The bits you cut out from the middle of the rings will become the tops.  They need to come out of the 0ven 5-10 minutes before the rest or they'll be black.

   Both the tops and vol-au-vents themselves will truly benefit from being slid onto a wire cooling rack to cool.  Letting them cool on the solid tray encourages the bottoms to sink down and go claggy.

   If any of them have gone really lopsided wait until they cool and then trim them level on the underside with a truly sharp knife.  (Next time roll your pastry more evenly.)

   =====

   The choice of filling is wide open, Savoury or sweet.

   For savoury fillings you make a basic white or pink sauce, using your own preferred method, and stir in shrimps, finely diced ham, whatever.  Even those revolting anchovies if you like them.

   If your tastes run more towards cakes and you've made a longish rectangle case (An oblong-au-vent?) with raised sides then you can arrange fruit in there.  Sliced pear, apricot, strawberries, etc.  Then pour in some flan jelly (not absolutely essential but it will seal it all together,  Then top it with whipped cream if you want.  Even add nut sprinkles, chocolate curls,  or whatever on top.   The sort of thing you'd add to a gateau ;-) That's it for individual ones.  If it's big enough you can slice it with a sharp and wet knife  (hot water) into individual bars.  Hot and wet doesn't catch on the jelly.

   Remember to slice, don't press down and just crush it to death.  One cut forward and one back will do it nicely if  your knife is truly sharp.  Serrated or plain?  Fine serrations shouldn't rip it up, but the coarser ones on a bread knife will probably catch and smear the contents.  Why do everything else well and then spoil it at the end?

   Below is  a picture of an empty rectangular puff pastry case.  I didn't fill this because it was made from the dubious pastry. It would have been taller if the puff was fresh.  Lleft click to enlarge picture)

   Half a century ago we made this kind of thing for 'the carriage trade' and charged a price appropriate to the time it took.

   We also made little pastry boats, savoury bateaux.

   Gyppo
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on January 12, 2021, 02:04:30 PM
Your butter tub reminded me of one of my favourite comedy scenes of all time. Probably only suitable for the English.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IPsSzLnXJkg
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on January 12, 2021, 02:14:29 PM
One of life's greatest problems is knowing what to do if you have too much sourdough starter. You know, you have half a jar of the stuff and its gagging to be used; bubbling and frothing like a volcano, but the freezer is already full of loaves.

Here's a solution.

Take 100g of Mr Frothy from the comfort of its jary home and add to it, 150g of flour, 80g of water (adjust as necessary) and 1/2 tsp of salt. Knead it for a couple of minutes then roll it into a sausage shape. Leave it to prove somewhere warm until doubled in size then slash the top and bake at about 210 for 25 mins. Result = 1 french stick. Make this into garlic bread and eat it as a snack.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on January 14, 2021, 08:39:36 PM
Pic of the above.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on January 14, 2021, 09:09:45 PM
They look rather tasty.

Your excess of sourdough reminds me of a Cornish yeast-cake recipe which was doing the rounds when I lived down there.  I can't recall the details now but you created a bubbly mess in something like a large ice-cream tub, with a lid, which you had to feed with flour and a little bit of sugar every day,.  I think this was okay for abut four days after which it started to smell a bit skanky.  (The smell of yeast which has gone bad  - died - is rather horrible.)

Before the four days was up you were supposed to take half of it, add fruit, sugar, flour, etc and make  a cake, which would fill a fairly tall 8" square or round tin.

It was a nice cake, and the first few were usually eaten well within the four day limit so you'd split the starter and make another one.  But eventually the novelty wore off and you'd be left with a plastic tub of frothing goo which you knew you weren't going to use.

So you split it in two and gave it to a couple of friends with the instructions.
Within a few months nearly everyone had a 'starter' bubbling evilly away in their kitchen and no-one left to share it with.

Eventually a lot of them were quietly flushed down the toilet or tipped onto a compost heap.

I sometimes wonder if the sewage system in Cornwall is still bubbling merrily away in it's subterranean lair, and 'That bloody thing from came from Padstow.' is still alive, still feeding on various other foodstuffs things which get flushed away'.

I also don't doubt that every now and then the next generation finds the recipe and the damned thing starts to spread all over again.

=====

Puff pastry day tomorrow if Alma comes over to visit.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on January 15, 2021, 10:07:47 PM
Alma's Pastry Day 1

My apprentice pastry cook had her first lesson today.  There will be several posts in this sequence.  All pictures  can be left clicked to enlarge.

We started with a proper apprentice's job.  Whisking up an egg for egg-wash.



Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on January 15, 2021, 10:11:55 PM
Alma's Pastry Day 2

Although we used pre-sheeted pasty (ready rolled), we stretched it a bit with the real rolling pin.  A bit big  for her little hands, but she did well.

Pre-sheeted comes with a paper backing, so although we had cleaned the work surface we didn't need to dust it with flour.

Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on January 15, 2021, 10:16:37 PM
Alma's Pastry Day 3

She was a bit too short for the work surface, so had the hold the knife at a strange angle for her.  Needed the point though to cut along the lines I'd marked out to guide her in getting six decent squares.  Seemed pleased to be trusted with my proper knife though.



Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on January 15, 2021, 10:20:59 PM
Alma's Pastry Day 4

First time she's ever handled raw bacon.  Didn't greatly care for the slippery feeling.  But she kept working until all the squares were decorated with a diagonal slice.  Half a rasher each is plenty.

Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on January 15, 2021, 10:23:23 PM
Alma's Pastry Day 5

Adding the cheese, and learning to keep it all diagonal so it will wrap neatly.

Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on January 15, 2021, 10:27:04 PM
Alma's Pastry Day 6

Sealing the piggies after egg-washing the  first fold to help it stick down and not fly open in the oven.  Giving it a good press, the dent will vanish during baking.

Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Spell Chick on January 15, 2021, 10:34:02 PM
She did a great job. But there is no picture of her eating them. Yet.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on January 15, 2021, 10:39:21 PM
Alma's Pastry Day 7

Finished piggies, and one triumphant apprentice. All thoroughly egg washed again to give a nice golden brown top.  She is a tidy little worker.

We trayed up three to bake, (They had to be tried). and bagged up three for the freezer.  One triumphant little apprentice, who then dragged me off for sword-fighting practice whilst they baked.

30 Minutes at 200C.

They came out lovely, but we'd eaten them before anyone realised we hadn't taken an oven-fresh picture.  (I'll try to remember to add one when I bake the the others in a few days time.)

A fun little teaching session.  I demonstrated each stage on two examples and left her to copy me on the other four.  She watched like a hawk to make sure she got it right.

Gyppo




Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on January 16, 2021, 07:54:28 AM
Now that's what I call home-schooling!

I'm feeling stupid though. It took me ages to realise that the pictures were not taken over a number of days.  :-[

Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on January 16, 2021, 10:48:35 AM
Home-schooling indeed ;-)

Good Lord, no.  Took about thirty minutes, tops.  Would take ten to fifteen minutes just doing it without giving instructions.  Given enough room to work it wouldn't take much longer to make a few dozen.

The 'day numbers' were actually photo and text clip numbers for my own benefit.  I selected the pictures to use for each step.  Wrote a few words to go with each, and then saved them on my magic clipboard.  Had the clipboard open down one side of the screen so I could just copy the bits across to the individual posts in sequence.

It also went out as an email to family, turned into one long document with pictures inserted into the text.  This didn't have the 'day' numbers but had the essential key paragraphs and photos as the main body, and a few additional 'family only' comments peppered throughout.

One thing you learn as a magazine writer is when and how to recycle your own text ;-)

Final note:  I'm going to pension off the eggwash/'pastry brush, because it keeps shedding hairs.  Being light coloured they're not so easy to spot against light coloured pastry.  It's also rounded, which does nothing to improve its painting and liquid holding qualities.

I may buy one of those silicone ones, which are easier to clean.  But I'll probably just buy a 1 1/2" paintbrush with dark bristles.  If they start to shed they really stand out.  Plus one dip in the eggwash would hold enough egg to paint all six of those piggies, or a long line of sausage rolls.  (Less drip, less mess, less clean up afterwards.)

For brushing excess flour off pastry after rolling, and for general tidying up of dusty left-overs on the workbench, one of those broad wallpaper smoothing brushes is ideal.  The bristles are longer and softer so they gather the dry flour/sugar/sprinkly stuff rather well.  Short bristles bend and flick straight, scattering what you're trying to clean up.  If you manage to keep it dry it never goes skanky.  Yet again, dark bristles from choice.

If you drill a hole in one end of the handle you can hang it up fairly high on the side of a cabinet or kitchen wall, so you won't absentmindedly pick it up and use it for 'dirty' brushing.  Also helps discourage those thoughtless sods who just grab the nearest brush and don't always appreciate that 'food tools' aren't for general use ;-)   

Gyppo
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Spell Chick on January 17, 2021, 02:31:14 PM
I have the silicone ones (different sizes) and use them frequently without any issues. They hold a reasonable amount and are great at spreading that crap around.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on January 17, 2021, 06:08:28 PM
If I can get one cheap enough I'll give it a fair trial.  I'm not against innovation, per se. as long as it shows real benefits.  I use silicone spatulas to flip things on my electric skillet.

I'm a definite enthusiast for silicone baking sheet liners.  Would be happier still if they were thicker though, like the ones we trialled thirty plus years ago at the bakery.  At the time they were just too expensive for wide adoption in the trade.  18" x 30" sheets of the stuff.  Called something like Sili-Mat or Sili-Plat.

The modern equivalent on a skimpy cut-to-size roll is lasting well in my kitchen, but feels as if it's made 'down to a price'.

Can't recall what those sturdy originals cost, but the supplier wanted them back after a month.  Very much only on loan, with an open invitation to 'Abuse them as much as you like.  Apart from using sharp knives on them'.

Gyppo
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on January 22, 2021, 09:00:32 PM
Having a stab at making bread pudding tonight.  This isn't the 'bread and butter pudding' or 'washday pudding' made with fruit, sugar, and half a dozen thick slices of well-buttered bread layered into a glass bowl with milk and other ingredients.

This is the Northern/Midlands 'Wet Nelly' made with stale bread and water, and moist brown sugar, and sultanas, a bit of butter, and an egg.   The stale bread is broken up and soaked in cold water, after which you strain off the surplus water, add the other ingredients, and squish it all into a hideous brown mess.   Plus spice to suit, usually nutmeg.

At the bakery we made a huge bowl of the stuff, bashed up in a five gallon bowl on the mixer, and it was enough to fill several 18" x 30" baking sheets an inch or so deep.

I haven't made anywhere near that much, but it will be going into the oven soon.

If you're mixing it by hand, as I did, there's no problem, but if you're using a machine add the fruit last or it will be broken up, and really you want the sultanas to stay mostly whole to soak up the liquid during baking and get nice and fat.

If you're willing to let it stand uncooked for a few hours you can add some dried fruit, such as apricots.  But this time I'm keeping it simple.

Instinct tells me it might be a little bit too wet, but I live in hope.

I told Alma I would be making a bread pudding and she pulled a face.  "I like the the taste of bread, but bread pudding doesn't sound very nice."  Then she grinned and said "But I expect it will be if you're making it."  Let's hope I live up to her expectations ;-)

If it turns out well I'll freeze a few slices so we can sample it together next week.

I will take another picture when it comes out, in an hour or more.

Left click if you are filled with a burning need to see it any bigger.

Gyppo

Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on January 22, 2021, 10:29:27 PM
This was my nan's second favourite cake (it's not really a pudding is it) the first being Wiltshire lardy cake. She was from Calne so almost a moon-raker.

Thanks for the memory.

Let us know what it turns out like.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on January 22, 2021, 11:33:34 PM
Just taken it out after two hours at 160 C.  Next time I might try 180 and watch it carefully.
 
It's started to come away (draw back) from the sides of the tray, which is a good sign.  I prodded it in a few places with a knife and it came out 'nearly clean', which is another good sign.  (It will cook a bit more as it cools.)

I will tip it out and cut it into fingers n the morning when it's thoroughly  cooled.

It smells lovely, and that's without any added spice.  But the dark brown moist sugar gives it a good smell anyway.

In the morning we'll know how well it worked.

At the bakery we used to put it in the oven towards the end of the day, when the oven was turned off and bake it on the falling heat.  We had to remember to take it out in the morning before firing up the ovens again. Any sultanas sticking up above the surface would burn horribly as the ovens reached bread-baking temperature ;-)

Small domestic ovens don't hold their heat long enough to use the falling temperature method, but  you might get away with it with your Aga.

I'm pretty certain it was a bit too wet to start with, and the two hour baking time supports this theory.

Traditionally we used to sprinkle the top with sugar before baking it, which gave a slightly crispy semi-caramelised top,   But there's more than enough sugar in it already, so I left that bit out.

Just looking at it would probably send a diabetic into a coma ;-)

Apart from wanting to try it spice free I had doubts about the spices found in the cupboard.  All inherited from Mum.  Nutmeg, cinnamon, and 'allspice' were dated best before 2000.  I gave then the damp finger taste test, like a drug squad detective in a film checking the mysterious white powder,  and  decided they'd all 'lost their force'.  Guess I'll have to go shopping again soon

Here's a picture anyway.  You'll have to imagine the smell.

Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on January 23, 2021, 08:52:34 AM
It looks really nice.

Re your comment about the cooling. I think it used to be a regular practice to bake one thing, then bake something else in the cooling oven. As you say, modern ovens that actively reduce the heat are no use for that. Our Aga is only turned off twice a year - for servicing - so never cools. But the baking oven (1 of 4)  is about 170 on the middle shelf so I use that for this type of baking.

Are you going to scoff the lot or freeze some of it?

Last night for dinner we had roasted cauliflower and mushroom soup and one of my sourdough baguettes - recipe earlier in this thread. The bread was fantastic - he said modestly :) - especially considering it is based on waste starter.

The freezer is looking a bit empty so today will be a baking day. The plan is: Wholemeal and rye rolls, 100% Wholemeal sourdough (just given the starter its second feed) and wholemeal and linseed tin loaf.

I'm waiting for some new white flour from bakery bits. I'm trying a couple of new ones for my white sourdough. I'm not going to create new starters though, just split my existing white starter and feed with the new whites.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on January 23, 2021, 11:45:16 AM
The 'Wet Nelly" tipped out nicely once I'd freed the edges by running a plastic scraper around them.  Just caught slightly on one corner.  In the bakery we would have cut it into squares or fingers still in the tray, and sent then up to the shop a couple of dozen at a time.  But I don't want to scratch up my non-stick tray.  (I still grease the thing anyway, using the spray oil I use on my skillet.  The spray oil the railway buffet girl recommended years ago.)

I cut it into fourteen fingers.  Ate one to test it, and then another to confirm the results ;-)  I might add a little cinnamon next time, but it's pretty damned good even without added spices.

This was made with white bread, so any colour in it comes from the sugar.  The sultanas are gloriously fat with moisture.

I shall bag them up in pairs now, with a fold in the bag so they don't stick together, and freeze them.

If you make these and want them to look a bit more visually appealing then cut them into slightly elongated diamond shapes, not just squares positioned at an angle.  It's surprising just how different this can  look when laid out on display in a shop window.  (A nod to the old days and the 'carriage trade' again.)

Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on January 25, 2021, 08:12:04 PM
Finally.  A cooked version of the bacon and cheese piggies I made with  my Grandaughter.  The bacon is hiding beneath the cheese.

A nice light lunch.  Can be eaten cold, but I prefer them hot.  From a 'crumby mess' point of view they are noticeably less fragile when cold ;-)

Gyppo

Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on February 06, 2021, 01:29:19 AM
Made a special treat as an experiment for Alma and her mum.  They really like Oreo biscuits, but I can take or leave them.  With a distinct leaning towards leaving them.  But I buy the occasional packet just for them and if there's any left at the end of their visit they can take them home.

This week I broke up half a packet and mixed them in with strawberry jelly, which set in the fridge overnight.  It looked pretty horrible, but it tasted alright.  I had some whipping cream I was going to serve up with the jelly, but that hid itself on the fridge door pockets and got forgotten.

They took the rest of the biscuits with them to eat in the car on the way home.

One block of jelly makes enough for five or six jellies when you put plenty of fruit cocktail or similar in the individual serving dishes before pouring in the jelly.  But the Oreo biscuits soaked it up like a sponge, so I only got three, plus a half sized plain jelly.

Gyppo

Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on February 09, 2021, 01:33:55 PM
   'Shiny new toy' arrived today, four days earlier than promised.  The old hand mixer I inherited from Mum has been struggling for some time now.  It never could mix dough despite having a hook.  I can mix bread by hand, quite enjoy it in fact, but sometimes my back protests at standing by the work surface too long.

    Stainless steel 5 litre (Gallon and a bit) bowl.  Not massive, but big enough for home use.  Have already earmarked suitable shelf space for storage when not in use.

    Ran it with half a bowl of hot soapy water to make sure the whisk, beater, dough-hook, and the bowl were properly, (old school Food Standards), clean.  Also to check for any suspect scrapings or clonkings which would indicate potential problems.  Passed with flying colours.

    Six speeds, plus a 'pulse' setting for when you want to get the last possible bit of volume on whipped cream but daren't turn your back for fear of making a bowl full of butter.   (Would sure be faster than turning the handle on the butter churn at 'The Lamb' out in The New Forrest.)  The landlord used to give you a free pint for half an hour's steady churning, but not until afterwards ;-)  Timed by the bar clock.

     As a bakery apprentice I once accidentally turned 5 gallons of whipping cream into a bowl of unsalted butter.    A wonderful 'learning opportunity' ;-)  Never made the same mistake again.

    Won't be long before I make some bread, and a few other things as well.

    Left click to enlarge.

    ===

Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on February 15, 2021, 06:36:10 PM
Experimenting with my new mixer tonight.  Making, hopefully a wholemeal loaf.  This time from scratch and not a handy premix.

The smell of the yeast in 'finger-warm' water is amazingly nostalgic.  Reminiscent of early-morning dough-making with much larger quantities.  (140 lbs of flour at a time.)  The mixer at work was nominally rated for 210 lbs, three 70 lb bags, but it struggled at that and one day just snapped the two inch thick steel shaft.

We finished the day making bread in 35lb batches in a smaller mixer, (very tedious), and a man from the local garage, where they still made spare parts if they couldn't get them 'off the shelf', made a new drive shaft on his lathe and fitted it for us ready for the next nights work.

In return, as well as being paid, we occasionally let him use our ovens to warm aluminium cylinder heads and crankcases for Aston Martin sportscars to make it easier to remove and fit valve guides and bearings ;-)

The sounds from my mixer suggest the current dough is nearly ready.  Certainly time to check it out.

And here it is proving up nicely in the boiler cupboard.  The rest of my house was a bit nippy for bread proving.  Covered it with a clean cloth and propped it up to keep it away from the relatively cool surface of the water tank.

I used to prove home-made bread in a cardboard box on the work-surface with a jug of boiling waters in there as well for a steamy atmosphere.  If I'm going to be home-baking again I may make something similar with a plastic storage box.  But the boiler cupboard was fine for an experiment.

In a steamy box the surface wouldn't have skinned up.  It would have remained a little bit more supple and it may have jumped a little more when it met the heat of the oven.  But wholemeal is relatively dense anyway compared to white bread..

Left click if you need to enlarge.

Gyppo
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on February 15, 2021, 10:29:03 PM
Here's the finished loaf.

Slightly over an hour to prove up in the boiler cupboard.

Used wholemeal bread flour.  Seeing as I'm not making it for sale I could have bent the rules and used 10% white to make the loaf 'jump' a little more in the oven.  But I wanted to try pure wholemeal, just for the hell of it.  Far better for me anyway.

The fat component this time was sunflower oil, but we always used lard in the bakery.  Once again, I was curious how it would work.

I stirred some flour and a decent pinch of sugar into the  water and yeast to get it going.  We used to do this on cold mornings in the bakery because you can't make the water too hot without killing the yeast.  It was dried yeast, which I'm not really familiar with, so I let the mix froth up a bit sat in the jug by my computer   That way I could keep an eye on it for the ten minutes or so it took to bubble up nicely.

This was a bit of Gyppo pragmatism ;-)  If the wet ingredients had stayed dead I could have made another batch without wasting the dry ingredients sat waiting in the mixer.  Next time I'll trust it.

40 minutes to bake.  Went in at 220 C, then dropped back to 200 C.  I'd be tempted to try it at 210 but my oven won't set to that.  Bloody digital settings ;-(

The whole business, from raw ingredients to having a loaf tipped out on the cooling rack took about three hours.  Which is pretty much how long it took us to work through a whole batch on a grand scale.

Left click to enlarge.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on February 16, 2021, 08:36:33 AM
It looks nice.  :) Can I have a crust?

There's no need to faff about with the yeast these days. Try Alinsons Easy Bake (the green/grey pack not the yellow/orange). Just whack it in and it makes a perfect loaf every time.

If you are going to do a lot of baking, then this is a great yeast, But it only comes in 500g packs. https://www.bakerybits.co.uk/saf-gold-instant-osmotolerant-yeast.html
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on February 16, 2021, 11:21:02 AM
Cheers.  I shall look into both of these.

I was using up some Sainsbury's dried yeast which is close to the end of its official 'shelf life'.

Allinson's is a well respected name in the trade.  We always used their flour for the relatively smaller amounts of 'proper wholemeal', as opposed to the 'brownish' wheatmeal bread which always sold in far greater quantities.

Occasionally a 'flour rep' from another firm would give us us a free bag (70lbs) so we could  test their 'new and better version'.  We never turned it down, but I can't recall ever buying any other make of wholemeal.  If there was ever any customer kickback about 'it tastes different' we went straight back to the original.

(The boss used to spread his general flour order across two or three different local mills so as to ensure we were never caught out if anything went wrong with a delivery, or indeed if there was 'trouble at t'mill'.  One place burnt to the ground but we went back to them when it was all sorted out.

Gyppo

Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on February 17, 2021, 10:45:47 PM
Tonight's loaf.   Much better colour. Pretty much the same recipe , but I upped the sunflower oil and the salt just a little and doubled the yeast as it seemed a bit tired last time.  A pale 'straw coloured loaf is a sign of yeast that's just about 'shot its bolt' before you get it into the oven.  The previous one tasted okay, but as they say in school reports, 'could do better'.

It 'handled' pretty much the same but proved up in half the time.  Just as well I checked in the boiler cupboard after half an hour.  By the time I pre-heated the oven it was definitely ready .

Followed my instincts and baked at a higher temperature than last time.   220 C, or 440 F.  Definitely the right move.

Everything smelt better too, which is always a good sign.

When I bake white bread in the fan oven it tends to 'catch' on top and burn quickly.   Wholemeal seems more forgiving.

Gyppo

Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on February 18, 2021, 07:47:00 AM
That is a nice colour!

Re catching on top. I bake in the Aga as you know so have to be a bit creative. Loaves with added sugar would always burn on top before they are 100% baked so a put a bit of foil on top like you would a cake. Real bakers all over the world are probably shuddering at the very idea of it, but it works. I only use foil when I've added sugar so I guess what's going on is that and excess is getting caramelised and the foil stops that happening.

Or if I fancy a very well done crust but don't want it to creep over to the other side of burnt, I give the loaf an extra dusting of flour before I put it in. See result.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on February 18, 2021, 09:26:22 AM
Mark,

Nothing wrong with putting a sheet of foil on the top if your oven tends to 'catch'.  I do this with taller things like a cottage loaf which tend to scorch from too much top heat.

In the bakery our standard flat-topped  'sandwich loaves' had lids on the tins.  The tins were in 'straps' of four for quicker handling and the lid was in the shape of a metal tray with sides about an inch deep.  These were a loose fit, until they got a bit bent when dropped on the floor.  In which case a bit of rough 'panel beating' with a seven pound weight serving as both hammer and forming block soon whipped them back into line ;-)

Without the lids the bread formed into the classic farmhouse domed top when it 'jumped' in the heat.  The tins we used for farmhouse loaves were a little shallower, to allow the exposed top.

When I  need an extra dark crust in my little oven first I bake it normally.  Then shove it straight back in with the oven set to preheat at around 250 C, 500 F.  That sudden surge colours it up within about five minutes.  This is not a time to wander off and do something else, otherwise it will be buggered.)

Works well with fancy shaped loaves like plaits, where it's already a nice even egg-washed golden brown and a little hint of darker colour on the peaks of  the bobbles makes for a pleasing appearance.

Another colour hint.  If your white bloomer or coburg loaf looks  a bit 'foxy', with a reddish tint to the crust, it simply hasn't proved for long enough.  This is the opposite of the 'straw' colour, and is caused because the yeast hasn't used up enough of the natural sugar in the flour.  It then, as you mentioned earlier, tends to caramelise, to a depth of 1/8" to 1/4" throughout the entire crust, not just the top crust.  It sounds interesting but doesn't taste too good.

One of the reasons this happens is that new home-bakers are reluctant to let a loaf get 'too big' for their little oven.  Proofing to double the volume looks enormous until you've seen it a few times.

Some of those long-ago 'technical' lessons at tech college obviously stuck deep in the memory banks ;-)

Gyppo

Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on February 20, 2021, 12:02:55 AM
Nailed it.  Three nice repeatable loves in a row.  So that's my regular bread supply sorted now.  Two or three days from each loaf without needing to freeze it.

It toasts nicely too, makes for a very filling 'beans on toast.'

The first two tended to stick a little in my supposedly non-stick tin.   Both came out when I left it to 'sweat' in the tin for five minutes after taking it from the oven, but there were traces of crust stuck inside the tin.  Those two times it was greased with the oil spray I use on my electric skillet.  Okay, but not perfect

This time I went back to greasing the tin with lard, which is fine for the non-vegans, and it does seem to give a better coverage.  (The spray tends to 'pool' a little on the surface of the tin, leaving small bald patches.)  The one greased with lard tipped out without hesitation.

Now I have my regular loaf sorted I'll start experimenting with a few variations on it.

My daughter asked "Is there any reason you can't make a wholemeal Tiger loaf?"  I'll think about that.  After all, the only thing which makes it a 'tiger' is the paste spread on top before baking.  I'm onto this idea.  Either using wholemeal flour or white for the paste.  After all, for home consumption I'm not bound by labelling rules and regulations ;-)

My bungalow smells lovely.

Sometimes the simple things are just what you need.  A bowl of soup or beans on toast on a grey and miserable day hit the spot for lunch.  February Food!

Gyppo





Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on February 20, 2021, 09:56:30 AM
Gyppo

Here's a seeded wholemeal you can try. It's suitable for a 2lb tin so you may want to scale it down if you only have smaller tins. It's quick to make and will prove in under an hour in a warm spot. Second prove in the tin is usually 40 to 50 mins. Even though it's WM, the amount of yeast and sugar give it some bounce so I only second prove to fill the tin. You probably won't have nutritional yeast so you could just leave it out or try a tsp. of marmite.

600g   wholemeal flour
2.25 tsp. yeast
3 tsp. sugar
1.5 tsp. salt
1.5 tbsp. sunflower oil
1 tbsp. nutritional yeast
2 tbsp. golden linseeds
2 tbsp. pumpkin seeds
2 tbsp. sunflower linseeds
2 tbsp. hemp seeds
415g tepid water

Bake for 45 to 50 mins.

And ... please don't feed lard to vegetarians  :o You only mentioned vegans but vegetarians don't eat lard either.

M
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Dansinger on February 20, 2021, 06:48:32 PM
I still haven't nailed baking gluten-free bread. I used a commercial bread mix today, for a raisin loaf, and it actually came out rather good. it's not like real bread though. More like cake, but I'm not complaining about that. But I'm not fond of the additives and the soy meal they put in the mix.

I guess I need to figure out how to make my own perfect gluten-free bread mix with the flours I like to use.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on February 20, 2021, 07:51:26 PM
Sorry.  No advice on gluten free bread.  We made it a few times at the bakery for one customer, but never really got to grips with the damned stuff.  We definitely didn't like working with it.

More to the point with all the flour dust drifting around from open pan mixers - and damaging our lungs although we didn't know that at the time - we could never truly guarantee there weren't any traces of ordinary flour involved and the lady in question needed that guarantee.

Our boss found a large firm which made only gluten free products and found we could get a box of one dozen small (14 oz) gluten free loaves delivered by courier.  This stuff had a seriously long shelf life - measured in weeks  - so it never became a problem, and was very well packed.

She tried it and really liked it.  "I find it hard to believe its made in a bread factory and not a real bakery."  We sold some to a few other customers to mixed reactions.  It was never a commercial proposition for us.

The boss offered to to give her the details so she could order it for direct delivery to her home.

"That's very sweet of you, My Dear.  But I like coming here.  If I pay you in advance for the whole box could you possibly keep it here and let me have a loaf as and when I need it?  If it's not too much trouble?"

So that's what we ended up doing.  About every third week a box arrived, and every second or third day she's trot in and collect one.  When we were down to the last two loaves she'd pay out for another box of bread.

It was very well packaged so the risk of contamination was minimal.

Village bakeries have some very loyal customers.  Even when they know you don't bake their 'special bread' stuff yourself ;-)

Occasionally we'd have new shop girl come down into the bakery and tell us "There's a 'funny old posh lady' asking for her 'special loaf' and I don't know what she means."

We'd look up the steps into the shop and there she'd be, giving a little wave like The Queen.  "That's right, Dear.  Ask that young man with all the hair.  He knows what I mean."

We'd go up to the shop, drag out her box from the cupboard, and allow her to help herself if we had floury or sticky hands.  She'd carefully select one from amongst all the identical loaves in their green and yellow wrapper, thank us most graciously, and then leave us to explain to the bewildered new girl why the old lady was allowed to 'walk out without paying'.

I loved working in that place.  It was a people watcher's dream.

Gyppo
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Dansinger on February 22, 2021, 09:57:31 PM
Yes, being on a gluten-free diet is a bit of a nightmare. Worse than being in a wheelchair, to be honest. I want to be able to just bake a normal loaf of bread and eat it. But if I allow anything with gluten in my kitchen, I can spend the entire next day cleaning up in there. And then we're not talking about ordinary flours, because that is even worse. The stuff goes everywhere, and a year of scrubbing probably still would not get rid of all of it.  ::)

I can make some pretty good cakes and brownies. Pancakes too. But bread... I've never been a great fan of bread (I only ever liked it fresh out of the oven), but gluten-free bread. Ugh! Most of it tastes about as good as a cardboard box. But bread has one thing going for it: It makes for an easy lunch.

I do sort of like some of the Schär breads, but they are expensive. And I don't like all the additives.

I will get to the point where I can make a decent gluten-free loaf though. It will just take some more experimenting, but once I've got that perfect recipe, I'll save it and use it till the end of my days.

Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on February 22, 2021, 11:00:43 PM
Multi-tasking.

Here's today's loaf proving on top of my computer tower.  That way I could keep  an eye on it whilst writing.

This one was a bit of a cheat, using up a seeded bread premix that has been sat in my cupboard for long enough to have only a month's shelf life left.  It was noticeably slower than my own bread, but it got there eventually ;-)

Mark:  I copied out that recipe you posted and put it in my kitchen folder of thing to do.

Gyppo

Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on February 24, 2021, 11:23:37 PM
    Here's tonight's loaf, the first made from my bigger bag of flour. from Shipton Mill.  No more scrabbling along the supermarket shelves hoping the lockdown housewives have left some decent flour.  (This is lovely wholemeal flour, made mostly from Canadian grain as it happens.  'Proved' on my computer tower again.  Couldn't do this if I had a sleek modern 'all in one' computer,

    If my daughter really likes it tomorrow I may make another one for her to take home.

    My kitchen smells glorious ;-)  Whether it's healthy or not this is good psychology.  Makes me feel better, and believe me, that takes some doing in February.

    My Great Gran would be proud of me.  She made 14 lb of flour into bread once a week 'so she still felt useful to the family'.

    Gyppo

Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on February 25, 2021, 08:14:03 AM
One of my neighbours, also a home baker, is a massive fan of Shipton mill. He drives to the Cotswolds to buy direct from the mill shop.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on February 25, 2021, 09:04:39 AM
I wouldn't mind a look around their mill.  I was going to say the last time I went on a mill tour it was back at tech college, but that's not true.  I looked around the City Mill at Winchester a few years ago.  That ones a watermill. and although there's been several mill buildings, some lost to fires, they've been milling on that site for about 1000 years.

Now it's a National Trust property, with lots of interactive stuff for visitors, but they still regularly mill a lovely stoneground wholemeal.

Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on February 25, 2021, 11:14:04 AM
The last one I went to is also now NT. That was Dunster water mill in Somerset.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on March 03, 2021, 04:04:13 PM
    Stuck the bigger fixed shelf - as opposed to the turntable - into my little oven a couple of days back and baked on that instead.  This let me bake four wholemeal batons side by side.  But there's much more heat at the back of the oven, so I should have turned the tray half way though to stop the back ones 'scorching'.  Overall the experiment was a success.  Once they had cooled down the darker pair weren't 'crunchy'.

    I shoved two into the freezer, to see how they survive (one light and one dark)  and if they thaw out nicely later this week.  Ate one for lunch yesterday.  Slit it and then cut it in half.  Filled one half with two slices of hot bacon,  and the other with some smoked cheese I rather like.  A fine two-course lunch ;-)

    Exactly the same mix as my now 'standard' loaf, just a different presentation.   Even takes the same time to bake, which makes sense because it's exactly the same amount of dough just split across the four batons.  The same amount of dough made into a dozen or more smaller rolls would have baked a bit quicker as they'd have more surface area  to catch the  heat in proportion to their individual weight.

     The same principle, in reverse, as a mouse freezing to death quicker than an elephant.  Which may explain how Hannibal managed to march elephants over The Alps.  Definitely not their natural territory.  If he'd had an army of miniature men riding mice they'd have died and history would have followed a different fork  ;-)

Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on March 05, 2021, 12:55:29 AM
Mini-batons, what I'd call 'breakfast rolls.  Three and a half ounces when baked.
Made eight and we 'destruction tested' three of them.  Two with cheese and one with chicken soup,

The survivors are now stashed in my freezer.

Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on March 06, 2021, 11:05:24 PM
    Whole meal shortbread biscuits.

    I've never seen wholemeal shortbread, but couldn't think of any technical reason why it shouldn't work.

    Made a very small batch of six just to test the concept.  They're square(ish) because my new set of round cutters haven't arrived yet.  But I rather like the look.  About 3/8" (1 cm) thick

    Used just plain wholemeal flour, (not bread flour),  butter, and caster sugar.   Unsalted butter because that's what was in the fridge.  No added liquid or egg.  Baked for fifteen minutes at 190 C, 380 F.

    As with all shortbreads they still felt a bit soft when I took them out, but were nicely done by the time they cooled, finishing off in their own falling heat.

    Verdict?  Quite tasty and not too sweet.

    Next batch I'll try using moist brown sugar.  And then a batch with rolled oats replacing some of the flour.

    This is fun ;-)

   
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: DGSquared on March 09, 2021, 12:18:25 PM
Dillon, Eli, and I made the best homemade mac n cheese and garlic parsley potatoes this evening. Yum. I think the more cooking we do at home, the thicker I get. We also had a big garden salad.

We're going to have to try one of these bread recipes.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on March 09, 2021, 06:23:44 PM
Spot The Difference ;-)

Up until now I've been baking bread in a tin which was really meant for cakes.  It's a fine tin, but it's a little bit too small.  So in order to get a full proof I have to let it overflow a little and this means I end up with slices shaped like a cross-sectioned mushroom.  These don't always fit the toaster properly.

But, having got into the baking rhythm again, I've invested in a proper 2lb loaf tin.

Look at the difference, a bit bigger in all dimensions and thicker metal.  Will put it to the test tomorrow.

I think I'm in love ;-)

Left click to enlarge

Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on March 09, 2021, 06:41:01 PM
Made second batch of wholemeal shortbread using brown sugar this time.  I like the taste.  The butter was straight from the fridge, instead o being allowed to soften, so it broke up into small flakes and the mix felt and looked a bit like sawdust.  But I pressed it all together and it rolled out nicely enough.

There's half a dozen sat in a sealed tin now to see how well it keeps.

Next time I'll get the butter out earlier so it softens down first ;-)   I remember one of my apprentice jobs was to bash stiff butter, (hacked off from 28lb blocks with a knife which felt like a short sword,) with a rolling pin, and then push and squish it around on the table until it was soft enough to use.  In winter the store room was sometimes below freezing temperature.  But keeping it in the bakery itself would have been too warm.

Various online videos suggest 'creaming' the butter and sugar together before adding the flour, but if the butter's soft you can use the 'all in 'method, either by hand or machine.  If it's too soft you get a sticky 'dough' which is a bugger to roll out and handle.

Gyppo
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on March 09, 2021, 07:59:22 PM
Here's something I first had on a trip to Italy. It works very well as an alternative to pasta with a rich tomatoey ragu. Serve side by side on the plate. Don't tip the ragu over the polenta. It needs to be served as soon as it is ready and should be sloppy but not runny. This recipe is enough for two generous helpings.

Cheesy Polenta

500g boiling salted water
100g   polenta
1 tsp. butter
0.5 cup grated strong cheese

Tip the polenta into the water and stir continually for 8 minutes. Add the butter and cheese and stir until melted.

It is fab. Trust me. I'd eat it every day were it not for the sodding 8 minutes stirring! It's hard work for an old bloke whose job is to sit and think!
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on March 09, 2021, 10:03:05 PM
Dad used to make Polenta.  I don't recall this, but Mum said it was something he did every now and then.  Seems he learned it in The Royal Navy.

Eight minutes?  You need to be able to sir with either hand ;-)
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on March 10, 2021, 07:54:09 AM
The eight minutes polenta is the quick one. I think there's a traditional polenta that takes twenty. That's why you should never arm-wrestle an Italian housewife!
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: DGSquared on March 14, 2021, 02:31:57 AM
Here's something I first had on a trip to Italy. It works very well as an alternative to pasta with a rich tomatoey ragu. Serve side by side on the plate. Don't tip the ragu over the polenta. It needs to be served as soon as it is ready and should be sloppy but not runny. This recipe is enough for two generous helpings.

Cheesy Polenta

500g boiling salted water
100g   polenta
1 tsp. butter
0.5 cup grated strong cheese

Tip the polenta into the water and stir continually for 8 minutes. Add the butter and cheese and stir until melted.

It is fab. Trust me. I'd eat it every day were it not for the sodding 8 minutes stirring! It's hard work for an old bloke whose job is to sit and think!

Do you bake it, fry it, grill it, or eat it straight from the pot?



I enforced the cook and eat budget meals at home or eat out with your own money rule because these three boys are eating up our retirement nest egg.

It's been fun cooking with the boys but Eli, Dakota, and Darren are meat-eaters. Dillon eats chicken and some fish. It's difficult for me to come up with a vegetarian meal that doesn't feel like a bunch of side dishes. I will not prepare meat nor have it cooked in half the baking dish. ::)

We had stuffed portobello mushrooms, mashed potatoes, corn on the cob, and asparagus tonight. Lots of starch but still good eating.


Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on March 14, 2021, 07:50:50 AM
..
Do you bake it, fry it, grill it, or eat it straight from the pot?
..
We had stuffed portobello mushrooms, mashed potatoes, corn on the cob, and asparagus tonight. Lots of starch but still good eating.

Straight from the pot. It would go well with your meal instead of the potatoes.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: DGSquared on March 14, 2021, 12:11:01 PM
I have never seen polenta in a store here. Then again, I've never looked for it. We have a limited selection in our town. Would I likely find this in the flour or the rice/pasta section of the store?
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on March 14, 2021, 01:11:48 PM
You may call it something else in the US. Grits perhaps.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on March 19, 2021, 10:09:30 AM
I made two 'less than ideal' loaves in a row, and it's taken a while to figure out what was different.  In the first wrong-un I used lard instead of the usual sunflower oil as the fat component.  But that alone definitely shouldn't have resulted in a flat loaf.

For the second one I'd bought a new bottle of oil, but once again it was a reluctant to prove and the crust was the same pale straw colour.  Should have picked up on that clue the first time.

I eventually realised I'd left out the spoonful of sugar which helped to feed the yeast.  So the yeast exhausted all the natural sugar in the flour and then 'lost the will to live'.

Both loaves tasted alright, but were a bit more solid like rye bread.

The next one should be fine.

Gyppo
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on March 22, 2021, 10:20:15 PM
Experimenting with making crumpets this evening.  The first time in about fifty-two years, since we made some at tech college.

Just to be contrary I'm making them with wholemeal flour.  Iceland sell wholemeal crumpets but they're a bit too thin for my liking.  I see no reason why they can't be as thick as white crumpets.

At tech college we made one big batch of about two hundred, so we all had a hand in filling the rings and flipping them over on the big hoptplate.it, and afterwards they went off to the canteen.  It was one of the very few times we didn't make an individual batch each.  The only other time was when we made a whole oven full of slab cakes, 7lbs of mix in each tin,  which we then had to cut into individual portions and send to the canteen.  Some were mixed fruit, and some were just cherry.  The latter was popular amongst the students

We were hoping to make a big batch of chocolate slab as well, but the canteen staff said it didn't sell well enough to justify that.  They just 'bought in' half a dozen as and when the supply ran out.

Most of their stuff they bought in from outside shops.

Those of us who worked in proper bakeries, as opposed to the full-time  students, often wondered why we weren't allowed to have a proper 'baking day' and treat a days lessons as a 'working day' and make serious quantities.  The canteen had big enough freezers to make this viable . 

I suspect there was a certain amount of 'empire building' amongst the heads of the various food trades departments, and they didn't favour the kind of co-operation the real bakers understood.

The head of bakery favoured his full-time students, because they were more easily moulded into his idea of what 'real bakers' should be.  We part-timers, some of whom had two years or more real world experience before starting at tech college, had our own methods and idea based in the 'real world', and weren't happy making a single pound of dough and spending fifteen minutes producing six bread rolls each ;-)

We, in turn, thought he was a fake and a waste of space.   Most of the individual teachers were okay and knew their trade well enough, but he was a dickhead and assumed we knew nothing.

He felt we were 'unruly and ill-disciplined'.  He also assumed we were a bunch of thieves.  (I took him to task over this issue after he gave us all a group bollocking for something his precious full-timers had done.)  I wasn't inclined to let him rant on for ten minutes or so, using language which would have earned him a punch in the face if he'd talked to me like that outside of the college.  The best of it was, until I finally interrupted him, he'd not once told us what we were supposed to have done wrong.

He may have just been talking to us all, but I didn't take kindly to having my parentage questioned ;-)

After that he hated me, but he reined in his mouth around us.

=====

My crumpet batter is bubbling away nicely on top of the computer tower.  It's a strange mix, using both yeast and bicarb.   I've looked at several recipes  though and they're all very similar.

We shall see.

Gyppo
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on March 23, 2021, 12:15:28 AM
Lessons have been learned but nothing was wasted.  (Except my plastic mixing bowl which split down one side and is now in the bin.  Fortunately I have a spare.  But this is probably also on borrowed time as they get brittle with age.

Lesson one.  Wholemeal bread can take more liquid than white.  So can wholemeal crumpets.  My first batch was a little too stiff.

Lesson two.  Don't fill the crumpet rings more than about half way.  It doesn't look enough, but once it 'jumps' in the heat from the skillet/hotplate the ring will be filled.  if you overfill the bottom will be scorched whilst the top is still raw.

Lesson three.  I think a lower heat will cause fewer problems than too much.  But the jury is still out on this one as you need enough heat to make the crumpet jump within the ring.  Next time I'll experiment with more heat and less time.

Lesson four.  When the mix is a bit stiff you can make free-form Pikelets without using the rings.

Lesson five.  Because they were over-filled the tops weren't cooking enough before I needed to flip them, so they didn't have the proper open texture one expects from a crumpet.  But when I sliced one  could see it was there under the top skin.

The next batch will be a bit wetter.

The top right one shows what happens if you overfill the ring.

Left click to enlarge.





Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on March 23, 2021, 12:17:41 AM
Pikelets.

Rather tasty - if you like it - with a thin smear of Marmite

Left click to enlarge
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on March 23, 2021, 09:57:15 AM
I find the process of making crumpets a bit of a faff and usually make pikelets instead. When I do make crumpets I used silicon rings intended for fried eggs.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on March 23, 2021, 11:16:15 AM
That's more like it, Mark.  And yes, it is a bit of a faff.

I may experiment later with making a sheet of 'crumpet/pikelet ' which I can slice into squares and freeze.

Gyppo
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: DGSquared on March 23, 2021, 11:25:10 AM
Pardon my blonde, but, what is a crumpet/pikelet, what is marmite, and what, pray tell, is a faff?

They look like small, (very) thick hotcakes/pancakes.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on March 23, 2021, 11:40:50 AM
A faff is a nuisance, a fiddly thing.

I suspect they have a lot in common with pancakes, hot cakes, but they use yeast which is why they bubble.  You let the mix sit and seethe for about an hour before spooning it into the pan.

Marmite is a yeast extract based savoury spread.  Dark brown.  Looks similar to dark molasses.  See picture.  Some people will tell you it's the same as the Aussies' vegemite.  It isn't.

Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: DGSquared on March 23, 2021, 11:48:06 AM
Thanks a lot, Gyppo. ;D ;D

This household may have just had a rude awakening with my outburst of laughter after I enlarged that photograph because of, "It tastes okay though."

Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on March 23, 2021, 11:50:11 AM
You're welcome ;-)
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on March 24, 2021, 07:25:07 PM
We've been out foraging for wild garlic and Amanda is making wild garlic soup. My job was to make some soda bread to go with.

Here's my recipe (I don't think I've posted it before). It is very easy.

420g plain flour
100g wholemeal bread flour
1.5 tsp. bicarb of soda
1 tsp salt
1 egg
2 cups of milk. I use rice milk but skimmed would be ok. Or 50/50 milk and water.
A generous handful of grated strong cheddar.
A handful of chopped fresh parsley or a tsp of dried mixed herbs.

Mix it all together into a ball and bake it. I use a cast-iron dish and bake it dutch-oven style for 45 mins in the Aga. I reckon it would take about 35-40 done on a baking tray in a fan oven at 190c.

It makes a big loaf and halving the recipe is feasible. Take care not to overcook though.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on April 02, 2021, 10:32:42 PM
Made a second batch of wholemeal shortbread.  This time I exercised my new set of cutters instead of making them square.  Still just as yummy.

The third batch will be cooked in a slab and cut into fingers when cold.

Left click to enlarge.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on April 07, 2021, 09:59:43 AM
Shortbread baked as a slab to cut into fingers.  There wasn't enough mix to fill the tray, so I had to make a 'stopper' to prevent the mix from spreading as it initially softened in the heat of baking.

I used a bit of pine stripwood, but pine tend to ooze residual sap when heated and this will taint the food quite noticeably.  So I wrapped it  in silicone sheet liner first.  Fixed the liner in place on the wood with some big old fashioned drawing pins.

Once a pine strip has been baked often enough and turned dark it tends to stop oozing.  But I'd still wrap it just in case.

Left click to enlarge.

Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on April 07, 2021, 10:16:40 AM
It's making me hungry. I'm just having a coffee and a piece of shortbread would go very nicely! I've got coffee and walnut muffins and hot cross buns, BUT frozen.  :(
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on May 11, 2021, 03:26:34 PM
More shortbreads ;-)

Slightly different recipe, using Shipton Mill's wholemeal pastry flour.  This is milled a little more finely than the Allinson  wholemeal I've used previously.   They don't look all that different from white flour shortbread but they taste different.  Mix made 24 fairly thick biscuits, which took 16 minutes to bake at 360 F (180 C).

I also added an egg which made a slightly wetter mix.  Used one size smaller cutter, with a view to packing some into a Pringles tube to send to a relative abroad.

Some of this batch will be half-dipped in chocolate, so I can teach my Grandaughter how.  Will also try for the combed 'wavy' pattern

Commercially i would have probably sprinkled them with caster sugar as well, but they're sweet enough without adding extra on top.  I could reduce the sugar even more if I have to.

Left click if you feel hungry ;-)

Gyppo

Title: Playing with chocolate. Present day and nostalgia.
Post by: Gyppo on May 13, 2021, 10:27:32 PM
   These are my now standard wholemeal shortbreads, but raised to luxury level.  Half dipped with melted chocolate and then patterned before it cools too much with a serrated edge plastic scraper.

    I only dipped six of them.  I did two to show the girls how it was done, and then Alma and her mum did two each.   

    Then I poured some chocolate onto a sheet of silicone, spread it out an eighth of an inch thick, and when it cooled - but was still slightly soft - showed them how to cut out chocolate circles, square, triangles and diamonds.  Commercially we used to use these to decorate the tops of cakes.  At the bakery the puddle would have been about eighteen inches by thirty inches, the size of a full baking sheet.   

The triangles would become chocolate sails on a small marzipan boat for the top of a birthday cake, sailing on a sea of blue icing.  Fifty-five years ago it would never have crossed anyone's mind to buy them ready made.  These chocolate shapes were the sort of things bakers did in between other jobs.

    If you poured and spread the chocolate on a marble slab it cooled really quickly, even in an otherwise warm bakery.  If you had a separate  pastry room away from the ovens so much the better.

   If you worked with a sheet of silicone baking parchment on top of the marble slab  you could then just slide the whole lot into a wooden bakers tray and stack them about six or eight deep.  It didn't take long to have a tray full of each shape, ready to be stored in a cupboard until needed.

    If you worked directly on the slab you slid a long palette knife under the whole lot to break them free then packed them onto the boxes, in which case a sheet of ordinary greaseproof paper between each layer was adequate to stop them sticking.  The trimmings went back onto the melting pot.

    Made with ordinary baker's milk chocolate they'll melt at body temperature if you handle them too slowly.  If you used expensive dark chocolate couverture, (this is the stuff used by confectioners making expensive chocolates), it has to be tempered by getting the temperature just right.  It will melt in your mouth but not in your hand.  This stuff needs a thermometer, or a thermostatically controlled melting pot and is very fiddly in comparison with basic baker's chocolate.  Very unforgiving stuff if you don't follow the rules for heating.  But an absolute joy to work with once you know what you're doing.  With a fine piping bag and a steady hand you can make delicate three dimensional chocolate lattice work to decorate a cake.  (I would have to look up the temperatures if I was going to use the 'real stuff' again.)

    There is a very good reason why confectioners who specialise in high end chocolate work consider themselves to be an elite.  They've earned that rank ;-)

    I enjoyed doing the demonstration and sent the girls home with a little box of goodies to eat.  There are traces of shortbread crumb in the melting pot so I may just crumble a whole biscuit into there and turn it in a chocolate biscuit bar.

    I've had fun today, exercising old skills.

    Left click to enlarge.

    ===
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on May 23, 2021, 10:11:48 PM
Thirty loaves later...  The 16 Kg bag of wholemeal is empty, save for a very residual dusting.

Started the new bag today.

Got it down to a nice repeatable process now.

Left click to enlarge.

Gyppo

Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on May 31, 2021, 11:36:30 PM
Baker's trick backfires ;-)

With it being much warmer today my batch of shortbread dough was a little too soft for easy handling.  With a high fat content extra soft fat becomes a nuisance.

So I shoved it onto a plate as an inch thick lump and stuck it in the fridge for half an hour. to 'firm it up' a bit.  We sometimes had to do this with pastry in really hot summers, even when we made it using chilled water.

But I got 'sidetracked' by what I was writing and it was several hours before I remembered the shortbread.  Which was by then a rock solid lump.

I put it on the work surface and tapped it with a rolling pin and it shattered into several smaller lumps.

It is now sat under a cloth and overnight it will soften enough to be usable by morning.

Gyppo
Title: Between the words...
Post by: Gyppo on June 08, 2021, 03:16:51 PM
  ...I utilised my other skills.  I can write quite peacefully - and productively - with a timer to remind when other stuff needs to be checked.
 
    Made my routine wholemeal loaf and a slab of bread pudding, which is also wholemeal.  The latter will cut into fourteen fingers, be frozen, and used one or two at a time.  This one is an 'eyeballed recipe', apart from weighing the stale bread to make sure there's enough to fill the tray.  A part-filled tray is a bit of a faff, tending to spread out and burn on the thin end ;-)

    This is a fairly lean and basic recipe which suits me but anyone could up the fat,  sugar, and fruit content to make it a bit more luxurious.  In fact, seeing the local tree surgeon come home with a six-pack hanging from one hand, it has just occurred  to me that a bread pudding could just as well be made using beer as the liquid component.  Not for me, but it could be a fun experiment and might taste quite nice.  After all, beer and bread are both yeast products, so they shouldn't clash ;-)

Left click to enlarge.



Gyppo
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on September 12, 2021, 08:25:41 PM
broke open my third 35 lb bag of wholemeal flour today.  Which means it as approximately six months since I last bought a loaf from a shop.

Here I am modestly hiding behind the bag as I empty the last bit from bag two.

Left click if you feel a crazed compulsion to enlarge the picture.

Gyppo
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on September 12, 2021, 10:19:08 PM
I also made a small batch of wholemeal pastry last week, which I turned into 8 individual apple pies.  They turned out rather well.  When I make some more I'll remember to take a few photos.

I stuck some in a plastic storage box in the fridge for my 'testing panel' to try when they visited a week later.  They passed with flying colours ;-)

This was an oil-based pastry, and the 'raw taste' test wasn't too encouraging, but once baked off they tasted good.  I shall return to this experiment.

There was no sugar involved, except in the filling,  so this same pastry could be used for meat pies as well.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on January 31, 2022, 11:02:16 PM
I've had a busy evening.  Made a batch of wholemeal fruit scones, which was moderately successful.  they need more fruit.  The next batch I make will be cheese scones.

Also 26 oatcakes, a strange number, but that's how the mix turns out.  If I only get 24 then I know they're all a bit too thick  These oatcakes have become an important part of my diet after several months of eating them.  They're tasty as a plain biscuit, and can be topped with something either savoury or plain.  I've not bought any crackers since optimising my oatcake recipe.

I now make bread twice a week.  Once for my eight segment 'wheel loaf', which, suitably frozen, allows for my daily ration of lunchtime bread plus one extra for an occasional indulgence.  I also make a wholemeal loaf each week for my daughter and grandaughter to take home with them after a visit.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Spell Chick on February 01, 2022, 02:17:02 PM
I don't understand what an oatcake is, apparently. Or it is a different beast over there. I don't think of them as more than a different kind of pancake and cannot fathom them being a substitute for a cracker. I'm guessing I'm thinking wrong in some way.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on February 01, 2022, 03:13:53 PM
Patti;

Oatcakes are nothing more than oats, a little bit of fat (Rapeseed Oil in my case), and hot water.  Mixed to a paste and then rolled out thin like pastry before cutting into round biscuits.

They take a little over half an hour to bake and keep easily for a couple of weeks.  Beyond that time I don't know as they get eaten before then.

Here's a picture of them being served up with salami on top.  Does that make sense now?

Left click to enlarge.

Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on February 02, 2022, 07:35:14 AM
Patti

They are a type of pancake here too, but oatcake is prefixed by the county name. Mostly Staffordshire (where I live) but also Derbyshire and possible some others.

Pic is my Staffordshire Oatcakes.

Mark
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on February 02, 2022, 09:48:39 AM
They look rather tasty, Mark.  Do you have a recipe to share?

Mine are a slight variation on a Scottish Oatcake recipe.  The original suggested using two different kind of oatmeal, 'pinhead' and rolled.  Two much 'faff' for an old school baker, apart from which all I had in the house was rolled porridge oats.  I bashed them around with the oil in the mixer on a high speed for a few minutes so about half of them broke down, but left enough whole flakes so they still looked 'oaty'.  I judge it by colour.  It's a subtle change, but obvious enough once you've seen it.

If you overmix it still handles and bakes okay, but loses some of the texture.

I use water which is only just off the boil.  The resultant mix is a little uncomfortable to handle when it first comes out of the mixer, but it rolls out well without needing to dust the bench.

I upped the water a bit recently and this made it even easier to handle.  This can vary enormously depending on the 'make' of rolled oats, so I now stick with 'Quaker'.  Co-Op's own use noticeably less water.)

They take thirty five minutes to bake properly, flipping them halfway through to make sure they dry out properly.  If they're still even a bit soft they don't keep well.

A hairy-arsed wild Scot crouched in the heather would probably cook them on a griddle over an open fire.  I may try this one day.

Gyppo
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Spell Chick on February 02, 2022, 01:07:34 PM
It is nice to know that I haven't lost my mind. Or speak a different language. They both look tasty.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on February 03, 2022, 08:59:18 AM
Gyppo

Here's my recipe for Staffordshire Oatcakes. Just pasted from my own recipe collection, so ignore bits that are not relevant. I obviously have no idea how big your ladle is or what type of hotplates you have :)

Mark

This makes 10 to 12.

600g      tepid water
4       tbsp. milk powder


Whisk in:
150g      oat flour
75g      strong wholemeal flour
75g      strong white flour
0.75 tsp.   yeast
0.75 tsp.   sugar
0.75 tsp.   salt

Let stand for 1 hour.

Stir then cook as pancakes. Use 2 pans (pancake/frying) to cook 2 at a time, 1 full plastic ladle per pancake. Cook on AEG at level 11. make sure hot – oil "just" starts to smoke.  Don't try to time, when top dry or a bit before, flip, then keep checking bottom until done. Cool on racks and chill or freeze.

To make toasties: use cold cakes and fold in half and fill with grated cheese, red onion and Branston pickle. Bake in Aga top oven for 9 mins then let cool down enough to handle/eat.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on February 03, 2022, 10:48:55 AM
Cheers, Mark.

Won't be trying this immediately, but it's been printed out and added to my kitchen folder.  The thought of the toasties is particularly appealing.  Sounds like a fine lunch for a chilly day.

Gyppo
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Spell Chick on February 03, 2022, 02:46:21 PM
I am making Italian sausage tortellini soup today. I had a hard time finding zucchini for this. They are usually over abundant. I have no idea what is going on with our supply chain but the north being hit by a huge storm is probably going to make things worse.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on February 08, 2022, 11:28:47 PM
Been experimenting with small batches of wholemeal cheese scones.  Feels weird to only make six of something.

Yes, it's an orange coloured cheese.  (Red Leicester.)

They taste okay.  Would benefit from a stronger cheese though, or a mixture of a more mature cheese and the Red.

Definitely a work in progress now I've established the basic recipe.

I've stuck two into the freezer to thaw out in a couple of weeks and see how that idea works out.

Left click to enlarge

Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Spell Chick on February 09, 2022, 12:37:07 PM
I imagine there is no lemon curd going on these.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on February 09, 2022, 01:11:10 PM
That's a pretty safe bet.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on February 10, 2022, 06:54:34 AM
Gyppo

You might like this as an alternative to scones. It freezes well, so you can slice then freeze and defrost slices as needed. Or if you don't freeze and it starts to go a bit stale, it toasts brilliantly. Use skimmed milk instead of rice milk.

Cheddar and Parsley Soda Bread

420g      plain flour
110g      wholemeal bread flour
1.5 tsp.   bicarb
1 tsp.   salt
1      egg
2 cups   rice milk (470 g)
Grated cheddar and parmesan cheese and chopped parsley or dried herbs.

Mix without overworking. Form into a round on a baking tray and use a dough scraper to create a deepish cross on top. Cook in fan oven. Bake for 35 mins (last 10 covered with foil) at 220 deg.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on February 10, 2022, 08:57:46 AM
Cheers, Mark.

That's going to be printed off and go into my 'kitchen folder'.

Mum used to make soda bread fairly often when I was a kid.  I remember liking it, and sitting on the van step eating it.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on February 22, 2022, 12:18:11 AM
Another experiment tonight.  Chocolate wholemeal biscuits.

These are a basic biscuit mix, which can be flavoured or fruited in ,many different ways.  I made them using wholemeal flour, 20% of which was replaced with cocoa powder for a definite chocolate taste and colour.

If I'd had any white or dark chocolate chips I would have added some of that as well to add variety to the texture.

The secret here is to take them out whilst they're still fairly soft, and let them set as they cool down on a wire rack.

I cut them out thick believing they would spread a little in the heat of the oven, but they didn't.

Another time I may spread the mix out on a sheet and cut it into fingers after it's cooled.  Or cut them out a bit thinner and sandwich two of them around a buttercream filling.

I may also up the baking temperature a bit from 160 C.

But they taste pretty good.  Chocolatey without being too sweet.

Left click to enlarge.

Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on February 22, 2022, 07:57:45 AM
They look nice.

I'm not eating cake, biscuits, chocolate or sweeties, in an attempt to lose a bit of weight and shave a few hundredths of a second of my agility times. I miss making (and eating) muffins  :'(

I'm putting all my baking efforts into sourdough. I'm halfway through a 48-hour wholemeal sourdough experiment. If it works I'll post a pic.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on February 22, 2022, 12:17:15 PM
250g of very active sd starter whisked into 230g of warm water. Mix in 400g of stone ground wholemeal flour, add a tsp of salt and knead for about 10 mins, form and prove in a basket or bowl in warm spot for 6ish hours. Or overnight in fridge then 4ish hours. Bake in a pre-heated dutch oven for 55 mins - last 10 without lid.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on February 22, 2022, 01:39:12 PM
Looks promising, Mark.

My weekly 'freezer' breadmaking day today.  Toying with the idea of batons instead of my more or less standard segmented wheel loaf, but will probably put that off until next time when there's a bit more room in the freezer.   The flatter segments pack in more tightly.

Also have the big slow-cooker going with my Veg curry.  Enough for five portions.  Four to freeze and one to eat tonight.

May do cheese scones today as well so I won't need to do them tomorrow.

Gyppo

Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on February 22, 2022, 01:49:25 PM
The flavour is good as is the crumb texture.

It fascinates me how sourdough is so different to ordinary bread. Also, that you can get such a wonderful taste from nothing but flour, water and a bit of salt.
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on March 09, 2022, 12:08:46 PM
Scots porridge.

I ran out of honey the other day to stir into my morning porridge.  I was sure I had another jar in my store cupboard, but apparently not.

I know this hairy and bare-kneed barbarian Scots salt their porridge, so I gave it a go.

Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on March 10, 2022, 07:10:29 AM
Salt hardly seems a substitute for honey! What about jam?

Have you read any RR Hayward? His zombie books are brilliant* AND started out as self-published. He's also written some sci-fi which is not quite as good as the zombie stuff, but readable.

Yes, I do have a point if you will just be patient!  ::)

In one of Hayward's sci-fi books there's a great bit of satire on the impact of marketing. A bloke called Sven runs a restaurant called Sven's Eatery and all he serves is porridge and jam. A hacker uses social media bots to create hundreds of posts about how fab the porridge and jam is. A few social media influencers think they are missing out and repost the posts and soon Sven's porridge and jam is the hottest thing in the fleet.

* Here's book 1 (of the zombie books).
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Undead-First-Seven-Days-Undead-ebook/dp/B00A6BEET6/ref=sr_1_2?keywords=rr+hayward&qid=1646896125&sprefix=rr+hayward%2Caps%2C63&sr=8-2
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Gyppo on March 30, 2022, 02:26:22 PM
Made a dozen wholemeal cheese scones today, and they turned out rather well.  Two kinds of cheese in there, Extra Mature Cheddar, to give them a bit of 'bite' and Red Leicester for the taste and a hint of colour.

This batch jumped in the oven far better the the last few batches I've made.  Found out why when I read the date on the baking powder I've been 'using up'...

Best before June, 2014

It has a reasonable shelf life, but eight years is asking a lot.  Fortunately I have some more which has a few months left to run.

Left click to enlarge.

Gyppo
Title: Re: Cookbook time
Post by: Onideus on June 22, 2022, 07:39:53 PM
Anything you can make I can make smaller!

(https://i.imgur.com/cAQsBIK.jpg)

Also... BEHOLD!

(https://i.imgur.com/ZRQdXEO.jpg)

SUBJUGATE YOURSELF BEFORE THE POWER OF THE
BEEF AND PEACH PAPRIKA!

This takes a lot of effort to make, but it will assault your taste buds with PURE AWESOME!

1 lb-13oz can cling peach slices
1 1/2 lb round steak
1/4 cup flour
2 teaspoons paprika
1 1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
2 tablespoons oil
1 (16 0z) can tomatoes
1 teaspoon caraway seeds
Hot buttered noodles

Drain peaches; reserve 1/2 cup syrup. Cut steak into 2x1x1/2-inch strips. Combine flour, 1 teaspoon paprika, salt and pepper. Dust steak with flour mixture. Brown steak in oil, reserving remaining flour mixture. Add reserved peach syrup, remaining paprika, tomatoes and caraway seeds. Simmer 1 to 2 hours until tender. Mix reserved flour mixture with small amount of water; stir into steak mixture until thickened. Add peach slices and heat through.

Serve over BUTTERED noodles. ...srsly, make sure you butter them noodles or you're just gonna screw it all up!

Don't try and squeeze a calorie out at the expense of taste or my grandmother will reach down out of heaven just to slap you silly with a stick of butter!