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The Bar & Grill => Word Play => Topic started by: DGSquared on January 13, 2018, 12:48:17 AM

Title: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: DGSquared on January 13, 2018, 12:48:17 AM
Are you game to expand your vocabulary?

It might help to go alphabetically but opening the dictionary and pointing to a random word works too.

(https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/82/eb/c7/82ebc7291d1f1c71080780ad12a96838.jpg)
  I'll begin with,
A - Acersecomic:   A person whose hair has never been cut.


Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Spell Chick on January 13, 2018, 04:09:26 PM
bocconcini
: small balls of fresh mozzarella
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on January 13, 2018, 07:31:27 PM
capelocracy ~ government by shopkeepers

Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: DAnuchan on January 13, 2018, 08:11:16 PM
cucking -- An instrument of punishment consisting of a chair in which offenders were ducked in water

I've seen these but never knew the name.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: DGSquared on January 14, 2018, 12:58:43 PM
dactyliomancy ~ divination by means of a finger


Ha! That's one way to get flipped off. ;D
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Spell Chick on January 14, 2018, 01:08:02 PM
Sticking with digits


epollicate
1 : lacking a thumb
2 : lacking a hind toe —used of certain birds
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: DGSquared on January 15, 2018, 04:24:24 PM
Falsiloquence or fallaciloquence  - lying or deceitful speech.

Fatiloquence or fatiloquy is soothsaying or predicting the future.

If you enjoy or are good at deliberately using ambiguous language to confuse people, you are flexiloquent.


*It would stand to reason that if you are also simultaneously flatulent, one may suspect you are full of crap.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Gyppo on January 15, 2018, 11:25:50 PM
Farctate

Farctate. Related to farctate: Boulangerie. farctated, farctate - A farctated diner is one who cannot eat another bite; if you are farctate, you are stuffed to the gills or bloated from eating a large meal.

(botany, obsolete) Stuffed; filled solid. a farctate leaf, stem, or pericarp

I like this word as it is written.  But according to the pronunciation guide the 'c' is more or less silent, so it sounds more like fartate, which doesn't sound anywhere near as jolly as it does with a hard 'c.'
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: DGSquared on January 19, 2018, 09:23:31 AM
Gossypiboma - also called textiloma or cottonoid - a foreign object accidentally left inside a body cavity during an operation.

Get the gossypiboma outta here. :o
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Jo Bannister on January 19, 2018, 09:46:19 AM
(In surgical circles, a gossypiboma is described as a foreign object retained by the patient - as if the poor unconscious sod on the table was responsible, not the surgical team who were probably gossyping at the time!)

HAGIOCRACY - government by a group of persons looked upon as being holy.  More or less the direct opposite to Westminster.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Gyppo on January 19, 2018, 01:48:36 PM
'Hagazussa':  From an Old German word.  A hedgewitch or hedge witch.  Usually a solitary practitioner.  Could be loosely identified with the village Wise Woman or Cunning Man who generally knew a bit more about hedgerow herbs and their myriad uses than most people.  They tend to be pragmatic souls and don't get tied up in festoons of ritual which, for some modern practitioners of the craft, are the big attraction.

More likely to be found in a quiet woodland clearing or their own comfortable kitchen or rocking chair than cavorting naked on their fitted carpet in a centrally heated home.  Therefore not what my Mum used to gently disparage as 'Shagpile Pagans.)

Also sometimes called a Hedge-Rider, the hedge in this case not being the herbal cornucopia for those with arcane knowledge but the metaphorical barrier between this mundane world and any others which may be there.

In this respect many writers of fiction, who easily slip in and out of their characters' worlds in order to write about them, could also be called Hedge-Riders.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Spell Chick on January 20, 2018, 01:36:20 PM
intumesce

verb (used without object), intumesced, intumescing.
1. to swell up, as with heat; become tumid.
2. to bubble up.


You men out there want to bubble up?
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Jo Bannister on January 20, 2018, 09:09:48 PM
Jipijapa - a palmlike plant of Central and South America, whose leaves are used for making panama hats.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: DGSquared on January 21, 2018, 08:41:03 AM
kainotophobia  - fear of change, resistance to something due to fear.
(Noun)


Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Mark Hoffmann on January 21, 2018, 09:16:04 AM
Limacology - To study slugs in an attempt to work out how they get elected. (I may have made the last bit up.)
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: DGSquared on January 21, 2018, 11:18:56 AM
Murenger - official in charge of ensuring city walls are repaired.

 

Moronger - Troll in charge of making other countries pay for great walls that people will just tunnel under anyway. America's version of a bridge troll. I made up the word, the description fits an actual troll.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Jo Bannister on January 21, 2018, 02:27:16 PM
Nodal point - either of two points on the axis of a lens system, so placed that an incident ray directed through one point produces a parallel emergent ray from the second point. 
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Spell Chick on January 21, 2018, 03:44:53 PM
omphalomesenteric

adj.
Relating to the navel and the mesentery.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Jo Bannister on January 22, 2018, 02:27:39 PM
Phytoplankton - drifting oceanic algae that live near the top of the water column where there is sufficient sunlight for photosynthesis.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: DGSquared on January 23, 2018, 11:51:05 AM
Quaaltagh  -  Manx English
Mid 19th century. From Manx quaaltagh, qualtagh.


The first person to enter a house on New Year's Day. Still used on the Isle of Man.

Also: the first person one meets after leaving home, especially on a special occasion.

The practice or custom of a group going door to door at Christmas or New Year, typically making a request for food or other gifts in the form of a song. Now historical.

Perhaps the origins of caroling and the song, We Wish You a Merry Christmas.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Gyppo on January 23, 2018, 01:46:17 PM
Quaaltagh  -  Manx English
Mid 19th century. From Manx quaaltagh, qualtagh.


The first person to enter a house on New Year's Day. Still used on the Isle of Man.


The practice or custom of a group going door to door at Christmas or New Year, typically making a request for food or other gifts in the form of a song. Now historical.

Perhaps the origins of caroling and the song, We Wish You a Merry Christmas.

In Northern England, and 'down south' if the the northern immigrants stick to the old traditions, we call this 'first footing'.

The rhyme is some variation on this, you knock on the door after midnight and when it's 'cracked open' you recite the following.
 
"Old Year out, New Year in, please will ye gi' mi a New Year gift.  Hole in mi stockin', hole in mi shoe, if ye havenae got a penny an ha'penny will do.  If ye havnae got an ha'penny a farthin' will do, but if ye havenae got a farthin' then God Bless You."
 
Traditionally the 'first footer' delivers a small lump of coal, and in return for bringing in a year of good luck receives a mince pie and a small drink.

If you live alone and don't have a neighbour willing to do the deed for you then you need to be outside before midnight and let yourself back in.  Mumbling to yourself is optional, but it makes sure you remember the words ;-)
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Spell Chick on January 23, 2018, 05:12:36 PM
rhumb
 
noun, Navigation.
1. rhumb line. (a curve on the surface of a sphere that cuts all meridians at the same angle. It is the path taken by a vessel or aircraft that maintains a constant compass direction.)

2. a point of the compass.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Jo Bannister on January 24, 2018, 02:27:36 PM
Slime mould - possibly the weirdest thing in creation, it spends most of its life as a vegetable.  But in times of stress, it is capable of dragging itself into an animal-like individual which can then move off in search of better conditions.  (It doesn't go very far, its ambulatory ambitions seem to be fairly limited, but you'll wait a long time to see a potato to pull the same trick.)
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Gyppo on January 24, 2018, 02:43:53 PM
I used to work with a chap who did his Uni thesis on slime moulds.  His wife called it an unnatural obsession.  Mind you, she did hers on Anglo-Saxon literature and had her typewriter modified so she could type the 'thorn' symbol, þ without having to keep doctoring it with a pen.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: DGSquared on January 25, 2018, 07:37:57 AM
Quaaltagh  -  Manx English
Mid 19th century. From Manx quaaltagh, qualtagh.


The first person to enter a house on New Year's Day. Still used on the Isle of Man.


The practice or custom of a group going door to door at Christmas or New Year, typically making a request for food or other gifts in the form of a song. Now historical.

Perhaps the origins of caroling and the song, We Wish You a Merry Christmas.

In Northern England, and 'down south' if the the northern immigrants stick to the old traditions, we call this 'first footing'.

The rhyme is some variation on this, you knock on the door after midnight and when it's 'cracked open' you recite the following.
 
"Old Year out, New Year in, please will ye gi' mi a New Year gift.  Hole in mi stockin', hole in mi shoe, if ye havenae got a penny an ha'penny will do.  If ye havnae got an ha'penny a farthin' will do, but if ye havenae got a farthin' then God Bless You."
 
Traditionally the 'first footer' delivers a small lump of coal, and in return for bringing in a year of good luck receives a mince pie and a small drink.

If you live alone and don't have a neighbour willing to do the deed for you then you need to be outside before midnight and let yourself back in.  Mumbling to yourself is optional, but it makes sure you remember the words ;-)
Thank you, Gyppo. That was fascinating. I am familiar with the last half of that rhyme in a song but the first half has been switched up quite a bit. I love hearing about traditions. Do you know the origin of this one?
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Gyppo on January 25, 2018, 10:50:19 AM
No idea of the origins.  What I wrote was the Yorkshire version as learned from my Grandad.  He would do the same for a few other houses along their street and the Irish couple in particular couldn't settle down until he'd been to visit.

When I was little I never thought to wonder why Grandad was turfed out of the house just before midnight,no matter what the weather, and allowed back in just afterwards.  He used to walk up to the corner, talk for a while with other men on the same mission, and listen for the ships' sirens and hooters from the docks a few miles away.

There was no motorway traffic then, no 24 hour TV, and it was generally a 'silent night' until the crews hit the horns.  If the Queen Mary or Queen Elizabeth was in dock, or one of the other big transatlantic liners, we could hear it even indoors.  Accompanied by lesser sirens and piping little whistles from the tugboats and fishing vessels.

Even if your own clock was stopped, and you didn't have a radio, you couldn't miss the New Year sirens.  The navies, both Merchant and Royal, could be relied on for spot-on timekeeping.  If you were outside you'd see them shooting off out-of-date signal flares/rockets which had been kept aside for the occasion.

Indoors, on the radio, we could hear the fading last notes of Big Ben chiming midnight and within a minute there's be a knock on the door.  Grandad, a tall old man, looked quite a threatening figure through the glass, wrapped up in his black greatcoat, thick scarf, and a broad brimmed hat if it was raining.  I mentioned this once and Gran laughed but said ""Ee, just as well he's not carryin' a scythe."  So I guess she saw it too.

=====

One year when Grandad was too ill, Paddy Murphy from up the street came and did the honours.  He didn't do the new year poem, but brought in a lump of coal which he ceremoniously put on the fire and spoke the Irish words for "God bless all here."

Paddy said this wasn't a specific new year greeting but something they did when visiting a friend, often taking in a small lump of peat from the stack outside the house.  A 'visiting gift' tradition, similar to many other cultures.  It can sometimes be a mere token, but if you're visiting someone unexpectedly then 'something for the cooking pot' is never a bad thing.  'Fuel for the fire' or 'food for the belly'  probably has its roots in harder times.

I remember Mum handing over a recently purchase tin of red kidney beans to the lass sat at the fire when we visited a New Age Travellers camp near Winchester.

She took it, thanked Mum with a curious old fashioned courtesy, and said it was nice to see someone remembering the old ways.  I noticed later that some other new arrivals to the camp did the same.  We were only visiting, but some of them were there for a week or two before moving on.

If you have a neighbour who 'just pops in for minute', saying she's 'overdone her baking and would you like half a cake or some home-made biscuits' she's probably just following an old tradition.

===
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: DGSquared on January 25, 2018, 12:40:26 PM
Up until after our first year here, we used to go outside just before midnight with big spoons, metal bowls, pots, lids, and pans. As soon as it struck midnight, we'd beat bang the heck out of them and wake up any sleeping neighbors. I'm not sure why we did it or where my husband got the idea. I assumed it was a traditions passed down from his grandparents.

Our youngest son started a new tradition he kept up for several years, a lemonade stand.

We used to live two blocks up from the Veteran's Memorial Building, a great hall with a stage, industrial kitchen, and bathrooms. It's where our high school proms were held and is still used for the big Alumni Dinner, among other things. The Lion's club used to sponsor a New Year's Eve Dance there. We'd end up with twenty or so vehicles parked on our street due to limited parking at the Memorial Building.

I don't know if while we waited with our kitchen percussion ensembles, Dillon overheard party goers talk about being thirsty as they passed by on the way to their car or if Dillon saw the opportunity to sell to potential customers he didn't have when he opened his weekend lemonade stand. He was only in first grade. He said, "Mom, next year I want to have a New Year's Lemonade Stand."

Sure enough, he remembered as the following New Year approached and began preparing. His lemonade stand was a success. He sold lemonade for one dollar in 16 ounce cups filled about 4/5ths and made twenty three dollars the first year selling to neighbors and patrons leaving the dance. He made thirty two dollars the year after that because more of the neighbors came by to get New Year's Lemonade. I'm not sure how much he made the following year but he sold out. 

On his 4th year in business, they cancelled the New Year's Dance but eight to ten neighbors faithfully showed up every year thereafter. He decided to stop after his first year in middle school. I'm not sure if it was because he grew bored or didn't think it was worth the trouble. Maybe he didn't want to be teased in middle school. Kids here are cruel and surly at that age. He had a good six year run.

Someone commented to me about what a pain in the ass this must be. I never saw it that way. It was a joy for me to see our kid so happy and industrious and it was fun. I tried to fully support everything they wanted to do. Looking back, it makes me sentimental. I wouldn't trade those moments for all of the money in the world.

~Deb
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: DGSquared on January 25, 2018, 12:43:53 PM
ranunculaceous   - of, like or pertaining to buttercups
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Gyppo on January 25, 2018, 01:14:36 PM
Someone commented to me about what a pain in the ass this must be. I never saw it that way. It was a joy for me to see our kid so happy and industrious and it was fun.

Some people wouldn't bother to breathe if it wasn't an autonomous function.  To these folks everything in a pain in the arse.  So I say "Bugger 'em", which would at least fulfil their expectations ;-)
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Gyppo on February 20, 2018, 06:58:00 AM
PANEGYRIC

A panegyric is a formal public speech, or (in later use) written verse, delivered in high praise of a person or thing, a generally highly studied and undiscriminating eulogy, not expected to be critical.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Firefly on February 20, 2018, 07:55:17 AM
quasiparticle



Any of various discrete physical phenomena, such as phonons, that can be modelled as particles and can be induced by the interaction of conventional particles.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Vienna on February 20, 2018, 08:18:34 AM

Snicket -A narrow passage between houses; an alleyway.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Jo Bannister on February 20, 2018, 09:09:41 AM
Ginnel - the same as snicket.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Noizchild on February 21, 2018, 03:52:16 AM
Aceldama: a place of bloodshed
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Gyppo on February 23, 2018, 03:38:19 PM
Bruit or bruited

verb
past tense: bruited; past participle: bruited
spread (a report or rumour) widely.
"I didn't want to have our relationship bruited about the office."

I can remember hearing this quite often as a child, but not for a long time now.

Derived from an old french word meaning noise or sound.  I can also remember people talking about a story being 'noised abroad', not necessarily meaning to foreign parts, which sounds almost Shakespearean.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Noizchild on February 24, 2018, 02:38:40 AM
Fane: a place of worship
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: herron on February 25, 2018, 04:04:09 AM
absquatulate

to leave somewhere abruptly
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Noizchild on February 25, 2018, 04:22:31 AM
Earworm: a tune or part of a song that repeats in one’s mind.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: herron on February 25, 2018, 02:31:27 PM
impignorate

v. – to pawn or mortgage something
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Noizchild on February 26, 2018, 04:50:17 AM
Bluebeard: a man who marries and kills one wife after another
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: herron on February 27, 2018, 03:26:29 AM
zoanthropy

n. – delusion of a person who believes himself changed into an animal
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Noizchild on February 28, 2018, 05:18:22 AM
Schadenfreude: pleasure derived from the misfortunes of others
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: herron on March 01, 2018, 01:32:58 AM
erinaceous

adj. – of, pertaining to, or resembling a hedgehog
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Noizchild on March 02, 2018, 02:32:18 AM
Apricity: Warmth of the sun; basking in the sun
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: herron on March 04, 2018, 04:55:06 AM
ziggurat


Rats good at running mazes.

Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Noizchild on March 05, 2018, 01:26:20 AM
Billet-doux: a love letter
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: DGSquared on August 30, 2018, 06:57:16 PM
 criticaster   a minor or incompetent critic




It's fake news! ??? :o
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Noizchild on September 01, 2018, 02:41:49 AM
Acerate: needlelike
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: DGSquared on September 03, 2018, 06:32:45 PM
Biblioklept  Definition: one who steals books
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Noizchild on September 04, 2018, 04:12:45 AM
Arctophile: a person who is very fond of and is usually a collector of teddy bears.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: DGSquared on September 04, 2018, 04:29:01 PM
 kainotophobia(Noun) Fear of change, resistance to something due to fear.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Noizchild on September 05, 2018, 01:48:11 AM
Titfer: Hat
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: DGSquared on September 06, 2018, 11:53:16 AM
Labiomancy (noun) A form of divination by lipreading.

(I've never seen lip reading as one word.)
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Spell Chick on September 06, 2018, 12:02:06 PM
Titfer: Hat


I get that email, too.  8)
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Noizchild on September 07, 2018, 12:28:22 AM
Oscar: cash
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: DGSquared on September 07, 2018, 08:29:34 AM
Mabsoot is Arabic for, happy.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Noizchild on September 08, 2018, 12:55:59 AM
Scooby: clue
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: DGSquared on September 18, 2018, 02:33:50 PM
Nail- old measure of two and a quarter inches.

Something I had forgotten and feel like I've learned it all over again.  Because, I have. :P
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Gyppo on September 18, 2018, 04:30:17 PM
Perch (also known as the rod or pole) another old measure (primarily for land surveys, but also found use in building, timber, and cordage) which was sixteen and a half feet exactly.

Which could explain why parrot cages are so damned big ;-).
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Noizchild on September 19, 2018, 04:22:48 AM
Adonize: to make more attractive; to spruce up
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: DGSquared on September 20, 2018, 03:21:35 AM
Perch (also known as the rod or pole) another old measure (primarily for land surveys, but also found use in building, timber, and cordage) which was sixteen and a half feet exactly.

Which could explain why parrot cages are so damned big ;-).
;D ;D

Quab- something unfinished or immature;  an unfledged bird.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Noizchild on September 20, 2018, 04:37:21 AM
Calescent: adjective 1. growing warm; increasing in heat.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Gyppo on September 20, 2018, 01:34:53 PM
Quab- something unfinished or immature;  an unfledged bird.

I know that word as Squab.  Is Quab an American variation?
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Gyppo on September 20, 2018, 01:58:46 PM
DISQUISITION.  A formal, thorough and detailed discussion or debate on a specific subject.

Think of an academic dissertation on a narrow subject and you wouldn't be far wrong about the style.  Sometimes still used to describe exhaustive, and indeed exhausting, religious debates, or the written records thereof.  Can also be used to describe an ultra-thorough business plan, as opposed to a more entrepreneurial 'lets wing it once we're up and running' mission statement.

I don't even like the sound of the word and have no time for it except as an archaic novelty.  Though this leads to a bizarre idea.  Christmas crackers for a writers' convention, each containing a paper hat which is actually large enough to fit an adult head, and an archaic word to bandy about with other attendees.

Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: DGSquared on September 21, 2018, 03:10:24 AM
Quab- something unfinished or immature;  an unfledged bird.

I know that word as Squab.  Is Quab an American variation?

It's not something I've ever heard come up in conversation, but yes. I'd seen it used by an ornithologist in a magazine once or twice. I looked it up again to verify its origins and found this at the, English Oxford Living Dictionary:
"NOUN
English Regional
A marshy area, a bog.

NOUN
A freshwater fish: (originally) †the miller's thumb, Cottus gobio, or the gudgeon, Gobio gobio (obsolete); (later) the burbot, Lota lota (now historical).

Origin
Late Middle English. Probably cognate with Middle Low German quabbe marsh, swamp, bog (also quobbe, quebbe); further etymology uncertain: perhaps from the same Indo-European base as quab."

                                                                 From:English Oxford Living Dictionary
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Noizchild on September 21, 2018, 04:50:06 AM
Carte Blanche: noun 1. unconditional authority; full discretionary power: She was given carte blanche to decorate her room as she wished, perhaps an unwise decision on the part of her parents. 2. Cards. a hand having no face card but with a special scoring value, as in piquet.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: DGSquared on September 22, 2018, 07:13:29 AM
They actually have, or had, a credit card in America, called, Carte Blanche, N.



Octothorpe is the technical name for a hashtag. ---->   #
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Noizchild on September 23, 2018, 03:02:18 AM
Anodyne: noun 1. anything that relieves distress or pain: The music was an anodyne to his grief. 2. a medicine that relieves or allays pain.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: DGSquared on September 23, 2018, 04:44:24 AM
Ineffable - adjective
too great or extreme to be expressed or described in words.
The ineffable natural beauty of Glacier National Park.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Noizchild on September 23, 2018, 05:37:15 PM
Benedict: noun 1. a newly married man, especially one who has been long a bachelor.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: DGSquared on September 24, 2018, 07:48:57 AM

Does that mean a newly married man who was a bachelor for a short time, is a, bene?



Quiff - puff or gust of wind.

My guess is, this is where queef originated.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Noizchild on September 25, 2018, 12:30:43 AM
Johnsonese: noun 1. a literary style characterized by rhetorically balanced, often pompous phraseology and an excessively Latinate vocabulary: so called from the style of writing practiced by Samuel Johnson.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Spell Chick on October 01, 2018, 02:39:08 PM
plunderbund
PRONUNCIATION:
(PLUN-duhr-buhnd)

MEANING:
noun: A group of political, business, and financial interests engaged in exploiting the public.



I didn't know there was an actual word for this.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Noizchild on October 01, 2018, 09:55:08 PM
Scupper: verb 1. British. Informal. to prevent from happening or succeeding; ruin; wreck. 2. British. Military. to overwhelm; surprise and destroy, disable, or massacre.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: DGSquared on July 28, 2019, 04:27:40 AM
I enjoyed this thread and learned from it, so I'm bumping it to see if it catches interest again.


Obelus The symbol for a plus sign. +

I always thought it was dumb to call it a, plus sign.


This is officially my 2500 post here.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Noizchild on July 28, 2019, 06:47:06 AM
Palimony: noun: Financial support or other compensation given by one member of an unmarried couple to another after separation.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: DGSquared on July 29, 2019, 12:13:18 AM
Sciamachy
noun,

an act or instance of fighting a shadow or an imaginary enemy.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Noizchild on July 29, 2019, 06:18:44 AM
Siren Song: noun: An enticing appeal that ultimately leads to disaster.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: DGSquared on July 29, 2019, 07:49:06 AM
Rame' - something both exciting and joyful at once.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Noizchild on July 31, 2019, 02:43:45 AM
Eudemonic: adjective: Relating to or conducive to happiness.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: DGSquared on August 01, 2019, 07:49:47 PM
Wrest pin

Definition: a pin in a stringed musical instrument (as a harp, piano) around which the ends of the strings are coiled and by which the instrument is tuned
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Laura on August 03, 2019, 12:19:16 PM
I came across this one the other day-

Bildungsroman: a novel about the moral and psychological growth of the main character

It's pronounced BIL-doonks-roh-mahn
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: DGSquared on August 04, 2019, 01:46:21 AM
Meme
noun \ ˈmēm \

Definition: an idea, behavior, style, or usage that spreads from person to person within a culture.

History: Believe it or not, the word meme was first used in 1976, as an abbreviation of the word mimeme in Richard Dawkins' book "The Selfish Gene" in which he discussed how ideas and styles spread within a culture over time. Today, the word has become synonymous with amusing captioned pictures and videos online. Think, Grumpy Cat or Salt Bae.


From the Thought Co.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Noizchild on August 06, 2019, 03:10:58 PM
Prosopography: noun: A study of people in a group, identifying patterns, connections, etc.: a collective biography.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: DGSquared on August 31, 2019, 05:22:26 AM
 Bellicose: Quarrelsome (its synonym belligerent can also be a noun)
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Gyppo on August 31, 2019, 09:21:23 AM
Bellicose: Quarrelsome (its synonym belligerent can also be a noun)

Damn.  I always thought that was a dodgy translation of belly-cosy, a thick knitted tube worn under the jacket and trousers to keep a protruding gut warm on long motorcycle rides in cold weather.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: DGSquared on August 31, 2019, 09:49:12 AM
 ;D


Sounds like a better explanation, doesn't it? ;)
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Noizchild on September 01, 2019, 03:48:49 AM
What is your word?
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: DGSquared on September 02, 2019, 07:17:30 AM
What is your word?
Ditto.  :P


Agelast - a person who never laughs.


              I cannot imagine.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Noizchild on September 03, 2019, 05:28:19 AM
Unbirthday: Every day not your birthday
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: DGSquared on September 04, 2019, 05:59:41 AM
Contumacious: Rebellious Cerulean: sky blue


I cannot wait to paint a contumacious blue sky wash.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Noizchild on September 05, 2019, 03:05:10 PM
Phillumenist: noun: A collector of matchboxes, matchbooks, or their labels.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: DGSquared on September 05, 2019, 09:17:06 PM
Nepenthe-
1: a potion used by the ancients to induce forgetfulness of pain or sorrow
2: something capable of causing oblivion of grief or suffering
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Noizchild on September 06, 2019, 04:26:11 AM
Guesstimate: verb tr.: To make an estimate based on guesswork. noun: An estimate based on guesswork.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: DGSquared on September 06, 2019, 05:08:03 AM
Ataraxia


Noun: a state of serene calmness.

Wikipedia:  (ἀταραξία, literally, "unperturbedness", generally translated as "imperturbability", "equanimity", or "tranquillity") is a Greek term first used in Ancient Greek philosophy by Pyrrho and subsequently Epicurus and the Stoics for a lucid state of robust equanimity characterized by ongoing freedom from distress.
‎Pyrrhonism · ‎Epicureanism · ‎Stoicism
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Noizchild on September 07, 2019, 05:45:24 AM
Gonzo: adjective: Having a bizarre, subjective, idiosyncratic style, especially in journalism.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: DGSquared on September 07, 2019, 09:46:35 PM
Effulgent -

ef·ful·gent
/əˈfo͝oljənt,əˈfəljənt/

adjective
LITERARY
shining brightly; radiant.
(of a person or their expression) emanating joy or goodness.
"standing there was my father with the most effulgent smile on his face"
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Noizchild on September 09, 2019, 02:32:22 AM
Charlatan: noun: One making false claim to having a certain expertise; a fraud or quack.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: DGSquared on September 09, 2019, 06:40:21 PM
Lachrymose: Tearful
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Noizchild on September 10, 2019, 05:52:52 AM
Prosopography: noun: A study of people in a group, identifying patterns, connections, etc.: a collective biography.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: DGSquared on September 10, 2019, 09:25:52 AM
Ubuntu noun

SOUTH AFRICAN
a quality that includes the essential human virtues; compassion and humanity.
"there is a need for understanding not vengeance, ubuntu not victimization"
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Noizchild on September 11, 2019, 02:12:21 AM
Watergate: noun: A scandal involving abuse of office, deceit, and cover-up.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: DGSquared on September 11, 2019, 11:41:08 PM

inveigle
in·vei·gle
/inˈvāɡəl/

verb
persuade (someone) to do something by means of deception or flattery.
"we cannot inveigle him into putting pen to paper"

synonyms: cajole, wheedle, coax, persuade, convince, talk; More
gain entrance to (a place) by persuading (someone) with deception or flattery.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Noizchild on September 12, 2019, 04:58:26 PM
Xanthic: adjective: Yellow or yellowish.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: DGSquared on September 14, 2019, 06:52:09 AM
abeyance
1: a state of temporary inactivity : SUSPENSION —used chiefly in the phrase in abeyance
… new contracts on all but one existing mine … are in abeyance pending the outcome of a government inquiry to be carried out into Australia's role in the nuclear fuel cycle.
— Vimala Sarma
a plan that is currently being held in abeyance
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Noizchild on September 15, 2019, 04:44:28 AM
Canonical: adjective:
1. Authorized; recognized.
2. Religion: Relating to canon law.
3. Art: Relating to a particular artist's works established as authentic and complete.
4. Literature: Relating to a list of literary works permanently established as having highest merit.
5. Math: In simplest or standard form.
6. Music: Relating to a piece of music in which a melody is played by different overlapping voices. Example: Pachelbel's Canon.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: DGSquared on September 16, 2019, 12:39:20 AM
Canonical: adjective:
1. Authorized; recognized.
2. Religion: Relating to canon law.
3. Art: Relating to a particular artist's works established as authentic and complete.
4. Literature: Relating to a list of literary works permanently established as having highest merit.
5. Math: In simplest or standard form.
6. Music: Relating to a piece of music in which a melody is played by different overlapping voices. Example: Pachelbel's Canon.

Dang! That's a lot of meaning in one word.

Lagom

Description
Lagom is a Swedish word meaning "just the right amount".
The Lexin Swedish-English dictionary defines lagom as "enough, sufficient, adequate, just right".\
 Lagom is also widely translated as "in moderation", "in balance", "perfect-simple", and "suitable". ~ ~Wikipedia
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Noizchild on September 16, 2019, 05:25:25 AM
Fortean: adjective: Relating to paranormal phenomena.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: DGSquared on October 06, 2019, 08:21:01 AM
For you history and fantasy writers out there, HALFPACE.

From Meriam Webster,

"Definition of halfpace
1: a raised floor or dais or a platform or footpace at the top of steps (as for a throne or an altar)
2: a landing of a staircase like a broad step between two half flights
— compare QUARTERPACE"
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Noizchild on October 07, 2019, 05:59:24 AM
Prosopography: noun: A study of people in a group, identifying patterns, connections, etc.: a collective biography.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: DGSquared on November 03, 2019, 05:10:33 AM


Orthography  Definition of orthography by Merriam-Webster Dictionary
noun
"1a:    the art of writing words with the proper letters according to standard usage
  b:    the representation of the sounds of a language by written or printed symbols
2a:    part of language study that deals with letters and spelling
                                     A student of orthography is likely to be a good speller."
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Noizchild on November 04, 2019, 03:51:37 AM
Red Queen Hypothesis: noun: The hypothesis that organisms must constantly adapt and evolve in order to survive in an evolutionary arms race.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: DGSquared on November 05, 2019, 05:29:26 AM
Pot-valor - Definition: boldness or courage resulting from alcoholic drink

The fancy way of saying liquid courage, pot-valor is the perfect word to describe how imbibing a few ounces of something can make a very bad idea seem like something you should definitely do right now.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Noizchild on November 05, 2019, 06:09:42 AM
Girl Friday: noun: A female assistant, especially in an office, who does a wide variety of duties.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: DGSquared on November 08, 2019, 04:33:54 AM
obsequious - marked by or exhibiting a fawning attentiveness


This is an interesting word that many people use incorrectly.

I actually heard a woman say, "That is an obsequious brownie."

I wonder who the brownie was fawning over. I laughed in my head.  ;D
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Noizchild on November 08, 2019, 04:59:43 AM
Ad Absurdum: adverb 1. to the point of absurdity.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: DGSquared on November 08, 2019, 05:34:04 AM

dithyramb - any wildly enthusiastic speech or writing.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Gyppo on November 08, 2019, 05:36:27 AM
We've seen a few of them on here over the years ;-)
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Noizchild on November 09, 2019, 05:57:04 AM
Akimbo: adjective, adverb 1. with hand on hip and elbow bent outward: to stand with arms akimbo. 2. (of limbs) splayed out in an awkward or ungainly manner: After the strenuous hike, she sat on the floor with her legs akimbo.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: DGSquared on November 09, 2019, 08:43:26 PM
We've seen a few of them on here over the years ;-)
I think I'm guilty of one or two of those myself. That is if one can be considered guilty of such a thing.  :D

logorrhea log-uh-RI-uh, n an excessive flow of words

~from, The Phrontistery (http://phrontistery.info/ihlstart.html)
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Noizchild on November 10, 2019, 04:09:55 AM
Atavism: noun 1. reversion to an earlier type; throwback. 2. Biology. a. the reappearance in an individual of characteristics of some remote ancestor that have been absent in intervening generations. b. an individual embodying such a reversion.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: DGSquared on September 17, 2020, 05:58:06 AM
What's wrong with us? Are we not wordsmiths?


Bloviate - talk at length, especially in an inflated or empty way.

I'm sure we've all met one or two people who have spoken like this. Not me. I'm always perfect. See what I did there? ;-P
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Jo Bannister on September 17, 2020, 10:48:13 AM
Muishond - one of two southern African weasels with white stripes on a black body.  Both emit a foul odour if attacked.  A bit like politicians.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: DGSquared on September 19, 2020, 06:31:12 AM


Muishond - one of two southern African weasels with white stripes on a black body.  Both emit a foul odour if attacked.  A bit like politicians.
Thanks for the laugh, Jo.

agastopia
Admiring a particular part of someone's body.


I haven't looked into it yet but am wondering if the word,"aghast" stems from this word or vise versa.

Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Jo Bannister on September 19, 2020, 08:58:03 AM
Cunner - a food fish found on the Atlantic coast of North America.  But doesn't it sound offensive!  If you ever want to insult someone without it being actionable, call them a cunner.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: DGSquared on September 21, 2020, 01:01:34 AM
Cunner - a food fish found on the Atlantic coast of North America.  But doesn't it sound offensive!  If you ever want to insult someone without it being actionable, call them a cunner.

;D ;D

I might be offended were some one to call me a cunner.  :D


impignorate
PRONUNCIATION:
(im-PIG-nuh-rayt)

MEANING:
verb tr.: To pledge, pawn, or mortgage.


Not at all what I guessed it meant.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Jo Bannister on September 21, 2020, 09:14:48 AM
Prothalamium - a song to herald a marriage; ie, "Here Comes The Bride".
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: Dansinger on September 21, 2020, 09:49:18 AM
Arachnodactyly -  A condition in which the hands and fingers, and often the feet and toes, are abnormally long and slender; a characteristic of Marfan syndrome, Achard syndrome, MASS syndrome, and related hereditary disorders of connective tissue.

Synonym(s): spider finger

(Comes in very handy - pun totally intended - when playing the piano.)
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: DGSquared on September 22, 2020, 01:58:24 AM
   
venlighed

Danish word for kindness or friendliness.
Title: Re: Vocabulary Exploration
Post by: DGSquared on January 09, 2021, 10:58:08 AM
'Kuchisabishii' is a Japanese word that explains eating mindlessly as a term, which means "lonely mouth."

I can relate to that.